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Full text of "Annual catalogue of Williamsport Dickinson Seminary for the academic year : from .."

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ANNUAL CATALOGUE 



-OF- 



WILLI AMSPOm 



Dickinson 5i:minai;>\', 



rOR THC ACADCniC YEAR 



-FROM— 



5EPTmBER9, 1901, TO JUNE 19, 1902. 



WILLIAnSPORT, PA. 



WIIvTJAMSPORT, PA. : 
THE SUN PRINTING AND BINDING COMPANY, 

1902, 



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J 



CALENDAR. 



TERMS AND VACA 1 lOrJS. 



1902. 

FALIy TERM 



Opens Monday, September 8, and closes Friday, De- 
cember 19. Vacation sixteen days. 



1903. 
WINTER TERM 

Opens Monday, January 5, and closes Monday, March 
30. No vacation. 



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1903. 

SPRING TERM 



Opens Monday, March 30, and closes June 18. Vaca- 
tion eleven weeks. 



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1901 

9 September, Monday— FaU Term Opened. 
13 September, Friday— FaU Term Reception. 

20 September, Friday— Term Entertainment by Music and Elocution 

Departments. 
25 November, Tuesday — Entertainment by Expression Class. 
7 December, Saturday— Anniversary Belles Lettres Union Society. 
18 December, Wednesday — FaU Term Closed. 

1902 

6 January, Monday — Winter Term Opened. 
10 January, Friday — Winter Term Reception. 

17 January, Friday — Term Entertainment by Music and Elocution 

Departments. 

30 January, Thursday — Day of Prayer for Colleges. 
6 March, Thursday— "An Evening With Ruth McEnery Stuart.' 

31 March, Monday — Winter Term Closed. 
31 March, Monday — Spring Term Opened. 

4 April, Friday — Spring Term Reception. 

10 April, Thursday — Entertainment by Expression Class. 

11 April, Friday — Term Entertainment by Music and Elocution De- 

partments. 

18 April, Friday — Mid-Winter Sports. 

13 May, Tuesday — Junior Piano Recital. 

17 May, Saturday — Children's Piano Recital. 

20 May, Tuesday — Senior Piano Recital by Miss Siers. 

22 May, Thursday — Senior Expression Recital by Mr. Norcross. 

27 May, Tuesday — Senior Piano Recital by Miss Ubel. 

29 May, Thursday — Entertainment by Expression Class. 

2 June, Monday — Young Men's Contest in Elocution. 

3 June, Tuesday — Senior Piano Recital by Miss Follmer. 

5 June, Thursday — President and Mrs. Gray's Reception to Senior 

Class. 

6 June, Friday — Annual Exercises by Primary Department. 

7 June, Saturday — Junior Reception to Senior Class. 

9 June, Monday — Young Women's Contest in Expression. 

10 June, Tuesday — Senior Piano Recital by Miss Seeley. 
11, 12, 13 June — Examinations. 

13 June, Friday, 8 P. M. — Exercises of Sophomore Class. 

14 June, Saturday — Reception by Senior Class. 

15 June, Sunday, 10:30 A. M. — Baccalaureate Sermon by Bishop E. G. 

Andrews, D. D., LL. D. 

15 June, Sunday, 6 P. M.— Song Service on Campus. 

16 June, Monday, 8 P. M. — Concert and Contest in Music. 

17 June, Tuesday, 9 A. M. — Contest in Essays. 
17 June, Tuesday, 10 A. M. — Senior Class Day. 

17 June, Tuesday, 2 P. M. — Junior Class Exercises. 

17 June, Tuesday, 8 P. M. — Scenes from Hamlet, by Expression Class. 

18 June, Wednesday, 9 A. M. — Basket Ball Game by Young Ladies. 
18 June, Wednesday, 10 A. M. — Reunion Tripartite Union Society. 

18 June, Wednesday, 2:30 P. M. — Literary Meeting of Alumni Associ- 
ation. 

18 June, Wednesday, 4 P. M. — Business Meeting of Alumni Associa- 
tion. 

18 June, Wednesday, 8 P. M. — Reunion and Banquet of Alumni Asso- 

ciation. 

19 June, Thursday, 9:30 A. M. — Commencement. 

19 June, Thursday, 2 P. M. — Annual Meeting of the Stockholders. 
19 June, Thursday, 2:30 P. M. — Annual Meeting of the Directors. 



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BOARD OF DIRECTORS. 



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Hon. THOMAS BRADLEY, President, Philadelphia. 

WILLIAM F. THOMPSON, ESQ., Secretary, Williamsport. 

GEORGE W. HIPPLE, Esq., Lock Haven. 

* LEWIS MCDOWELL, Esq., Williamsport. 

THOMAS H. MURRAY, ESQ., Clearfield. 

DeWITT BODINE, Esq., Hughesville. 

Hon. DANIEL H. HASTINGS, lU llrionie. 

*HoN. H. C. MCCORMICK, Williamsport. 

*HoN. GEORGE A. MADILL, St. Louis, Missouri. 

WILLIAM A. MAY, Esq., Scranton. 

ALEXANDER E. PATTON, Eso., Curwensville. 

REV. SAMUEL A. HEILNER, D. D., Philadelphia. 

Rev. martin L. GANOE, York. 

D. J. MYERS, Esq., Philadelphia. 

Hon. max L. MITCHELL, Williamsport. 
Hon. SETH T. FORESMAN, Williamsport. 

E. B. TUSTIN, Esq., Bloomsburg. 

S. W. RUTHERFORD, Esq., Laurelton. 

E. J. GRAY, Steward and Treasurer. 
Miss ESTELLA M. FOLLMER, Bookkeeper 
Mr. harry W. BURGAN, Stenographer. 
Miss LYDIA TAYLOR, Matron. 
Mrs. M. HAINKS, Assistant Matron. 



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alumni ORGxiNIZATION. 



BOARD OF VISITORS. 



CKNTRAL PENNSYLVANIA 


Rev. a. S. bowman. 




Rev. 


Rev. r. w. runyan. 




Rev. 


Rev. J. W. RUE. 




Rev. 


Rev. GEORGE LEIDY. 




Rev. 


Rev. G. W. STEVENS. 




Rev. 


Rev. C. T. DUNNING. 




Rev. 


Rev. J. W. FORREST. 




Rev. 


Rev. G. E. king. 




Rev. 


Rev. C. W. WASSON. 




Rev. 


Rev. 


WM. 


brill 



CONFERENCE. 

W. W. SHOLL. 
A. P. WHARTON. 
W. A. WHITNEY. 
T. L. TOMKINSON. 
E. M. STEVENS. 
I. N. MOOREHEAD. 
J. H. BLACK. 
R. MALLALIEU. 
J. S. SOUSER. 



PHILADELPHIA CONFERENCE. 



Rev. WM. POWICK. 
Rev. G. W. DUNGAN. 



Rev. F. a. GACKS. 

Rev. F. ASBURY GILBERT. 



S. M. MYERS. 

BALTIMORE CONFERENCE. 



Rev. W. G. HERBERT. 
Rev. G. E. MAYDWELL. 

* Deceased. 



Rev. T. M. west. 
Rev. J. I. WINGER. 



OFFTCKT^R 

Hc^N. A. O. FURSX, iXvJ;DiDENT. 

lilU.MA> if. MURRAY KsQ., ViCE Prtc^idenT. 

Mr^^ T m i^ TUCKS, A. P., Recording Secretary. 

Miss MINNIE M. HOOVEN, M. E. L., Corresponding Secretary. 

GEORGE J. KOONS, Treasurer. 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. 

Miss FLORENCE SLATE, M. E. L. 
Rev. GEORGE E. KING, B. A. 
Miss MARY C. PURDY, B. S. 
Miss JANE L. GREEN, M. E. L. 
Miss MAY L. CAMPBELL, M. E. L. 
Miss ETHYL WEISEL, A. B. 
Mrs. ELLA SANDERS. 
Miss DAISY MILLS. 
GEORGE J. KOONS. 
EDMUND W. FRAIN. 



ORATION. 

Rev. a. S. BOWMAN. 

ESSAY. 

Mrs. ELEANOR MASSEY FLUKE. 



RECITATION. 

Mrs. LULU JONES McANNY. 

VOCAL SOLOS. 

Mrs. BERTHA HUFF ALLEN. 
Miss SUSIE M. KRAPE. 



FACULTY. 



Rev. EDWARD JAMES GRAY, A. M., D. D., President. 

Ethics and Logic. 

CHARI.OTTE CRITTENDEN EVERETT, B. S., Preceptress, 

Psychology and Literature, 

JOHN FREDERICK LOUIS RASCHEN, A. ii., B. D., 

Ancient Languages. 

"^ ■•■ '^^''" -.y'}':- JAMES BRYANT MACK, A. B., 

Mathematics. 



CLARENCE EUGENE McCLOSKEY, A. M., 

Natural Science. 

THOMAS MARSHALL WEST, A. M., 
Latin and Rhetoric. 

MARY STUART CRUICKSHANKS, 
French afid German. 

SAMUEL MARTIN TRESSLER, B. E., 
Academic Department. 

MINNIE MAE HOOVEN, M. E. L., 

Assistant in Academic Departfnent. 

CORNELIA GRAY WILSON, A. B., 
History and Latin. 

EMMA CAROLINE FAIRCHILD, B. L., 
General and English History. 

Mrs. JULIA LAWRENCE GASSAWAY, 
Painting and Drawing, 

ELLEN SOPHIA RANSOM , 
. ^ D{fg(-lor Instriimeyital Music. 

Prof. HOWARD H. CARTER— Oberlin. 

Prof. KARI^ KIJNDWORTH— Berlin. 

Dr. WI1,I,IAM mason— New York. 



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JENNIE DAE GREEN, 
Assistant in Instrumental Music, 

EMANUElv SCHMAUK— New York. 

Mrs. STElylvA HADDEN-AI^EXANDER— New York. 

EDWARD A. McDOWElyl,— New York. 

ANNA NETTA GIBSON, 
Focal Music. 

CHAS. HAYDN— Boston. 

AI,BIN REED— Boston. 

Herr EDWARD GARTNER— Vienna. 

AUGUSTA HELEN GILMORE, M. E. L., 

Elocution and Physical Culture, 

ESTELLA MAY FOLLMER, M. E. L., 

Bookkeeping. 

Herr KLIEMAN, /Q^c^ 

Violin^ Guitar^ Banjo, Mandolin and Violmcello, 



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LECTURES, 1901-1902. 

♦Hon. henry C. McCORMICK, 
Political Economy. 

HERBERT T. AMES, ESQ., 
Commercial Law. 

Bishop JOHN M. WALDEN, D. D., LL.D., 
What and How to Read. 

ALBERT ARMSTRONG, 
** Beside the Bofinie Brier Bush.'' 

Mrs. J. P. MUMFORD, 
Patriotic Citizenship. 

BLANCHE ZEHRING, Ph. D., 
Deaconess' Work, 

WEEKLY LECTURES BY THE PRESIDENT AND MEMBERS OF 

THE FACULTY, 

Topics of General Interest. 

* Deceased. 



8 



FIFTY-FOURTH ANNUAL CATAI.OGUB. 



1 



GENERAL INFOI. MA i lUN* 



WILLIAMSPORT DICKINSON SEMINARY 

Is an institution of high grade, with ample faciHties for giving 
young ladies and gentlemen a superior education. It is organ- 
ized upon the plans which have been approved by long experi- 
ence, and adopted by the best schools in this country, embrac- 
ing all modern appliances in means and methods of instruc- 
tion. It was founded 1848, and is regularly chartered by the 
Legislature of the state of Pennsylvania, and authorized to con- 
fer degrees upon those who complete the prescribed Courses of 
Study. 

The Seminary is under the patronage of the Central Penn- 
sylvania Conference, being owned and practically managed by 
the Preachers' Aid Society. As this investment was rather to 
promote the important work of higher Christian education than 
to make money, the paramount purpose is to combine thorough 
instruction and careful moral training with the comforts of a 
good home, at the lowest possible rates. 

LOCATION. 

Williamsport is one of the most beautiful and healthful places 
in the state. It has never been subject to epidemics of any' 
kind. Many coming to the school in poor health have returned 
fully restored. The city is situated on the West Branch of the 
Susquehanna River, has a population of thirty thousand, is 
widely known for its intelligence, its enterprise, the taste dis- 
played in the character of its public buildings and private resi- 
dences, and the moral appliances with which it is furnished. 
In small towns and villages the facilities for culture — intellect- 
ual as well as aesthetic and moral — are generally limited, rare- 
ly reaching beyond the institution itself, and hence student 
life must become monotonous, lacking the inspiration which a 
larger place with wider opportunities affords. Forty churches, 
an active temperance organization, and branches of the Young 



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BRADLEY HALL. 



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WII.UAMSPORT DICKINSON SEMINARY. 



Men's and Young Women's Christian Associations, embracing 
many of the most earnest Christians in the community, with a 
large Hbrary, free to all, and accessible at aU uuic^>, hi luate 
some of file social :\ui] uli^-ious advantages accessible \n the 

}Ulllig pCUplc lii \\ iliUiiii^pUI I. 



BUILDINGS. 
The buildings occupy an eminence overlooking the city, a 



Viil 



are surrounded by beautiful shade trees, while the grounds 
contain six acres, affording ample room for exercise and play. 
The buildings are brick, heated by steam, provided with fire 
escapes, and supplied throughout with pure mountain water. 
They are lighted with electric incandescent light. The system 
adopted embodies the latest improvements in generating and 
utilizing electricity for illuminating purposes, and insures en- 



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tire safety from fire or shock, so that the wires may be 
without danger. The value of an illuminant which, consuming 
no oxygen, leaves the air perfectly pure and at the same time 
furnishes abundant light, cannot be overestimated. 

The main edifice, rebuilt and improved, compares favorably 
with the best school buildings in the country, and the Chapel is 
among the most attractive public halls in the city. 

Both departments are furnished with bath rooms and all 
modern appliances for comfort, and in the entire arrangement 
of the buildings great care has been taken for the convenience 
and health of the occupants. 

The ladies' apartments are entirely separate from the others, 
and there is no association of the sexes but in the presence of 
their instructors. The happy influence, mutually exerted, in 
their association in the recitation room, at the table, and in the 
public exercises in the Chapel, is to be seen in the cultivation of 
a cheerful and animated disposition, in the formation of good 
habits and manners, in ardent devotion to study, and in the 
attainment of high moral character. These, with many other 
valuable results, have established the fact that the best plan for 
a school is, according to the evident design of Providence in iiic 



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FIFTY-FOURTH ANNUAL CATALOGUE. 



WILLIAMSPORT DICKINSON SEMINARY. 



II 



constitution of society, on the basis of a well-regulated Chris- 
tian family. 

The members of the faculty live in the building, eat at the 
same tables, and have constant oversight of all the students. 

BRADLEY HALL. 

The new Music and Art building, named for Hon. Thomas 
Bradley, of Philadelphia, is an imposing structure, eighty-five 
feet long, fifty feet deep and four stories high. In architectural 
design and symbolic ornamentation it represents a very high 
type of utility and beauty. 

This commodious building is a part of a long-cherished pur- 
pose to provide a modern Music and Art conservatory which, in 
equipment of space and appliances, as well as in method and 
character of work, shall meet the increasing demands for wider 
opportunity and broader culture in what has come to be es- 
teemed an important factor in higher education of young peo- 
ple. We oflFer advantages for the study of music, vocal and 
instrumental, which compare favorably with the best music 
schools in this country, with the atmosphere of a high-toned lit- 
erary institution and the safeguard of a refined Christian home. 

Our directors and assistant teachers have studied abroad, as 
well as in the best schools in this country, and are thoroughly 
conversant with the latest and best methods of instruction. 

While chiefly devoted to the study of Music and Art, provis- 
ion is made in Bradley Hall for a swimming pool, a large and 
well furnished gymnasium and bowling alley for young ladies, 
with lockers, baths and all modern appliances for health and 
comfort added, as also a capacious Society Hall, a reading room 
and library. It is joined by an enclosed bridge with the main 
building of the Seminary, affording them easy and sheltered 
communication at all times. 

THE NEW BOWLING ALLEY. 

Mrs. Helen Eerguson Tustin, an alumnae of the institution, 
has erected and furnished for the use of the young ladies, a very 



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fine double bowling alley. This generous recognition of the 
value of exhilarating exercise is highly appreciated, as it large- 
ly adds both to health and enjoyment. 

HEALTH. 

The value of physical culture is recognized. A Inrqr Cam- 
pus, wii]] !^iinning track, knll and lawn Icnni^ i^mniKk iiw the 
gentlemen and lawn tennis courts for the ladies, funnslies stim- 
ulus and opportunity for outdoor athletic sports. 

The new Athletic Field toward which we have steadily 
looked and wrought, is completed and meets the highest de- 
mand. The ground graded and set apart for athletic uses is 
478 feet long and 300 feet wide. It will certainly comisare fa- 
vorably with the best athletic fields among Seminaries and Col- 
leges, and being a part of the campus, will be wholly under the 
control of the Institution. 

An efficient Athletic Association is organized among the stu- 
dents, under the direction of a Professor. A public entertain- 
ment is given in behalf of the Association once a year. A 
Gymnasium, forty by sixty feet, supplied with the best modern 
appliances for physical culture, is maintained for the use of the 
gentlemen, under proper regulations. All young men, not 
physically incapacitated, may be required to take systematic ex- 
ercise in the Gymnasium from two to three hours per week dur- 
ing Winter term. They will provide themselves with an ap- 
propriate gymnasium suit, including shoes. 

Lectures on health will also be given from time to time, by 
an eminent physician. 

ROOMS AND FURNITURE. 

The rooms are larger than in most boarding schools, being 
sixteen by thirteen feet and nineteen and a-half by nine and 
a-half feet. 

Experience shows that, except in rare instances, a student is 
more contented and does better work with a room mate than 
when alone, hence rooms are arranged for two occupants. 
Changes are made when the assignment proves unsatisfactory. 



12 



FIFTY- FOURTH ANNUAL CATALOGUE. 



A student rooming alone wil be charged $12 extra a term, 
which must be paid when the room is taken. 

Rooms for gentlemen are furnished with bedstead, mattress, 
wardrobe, washstand, table, chairs linokrnsc, brdrlini:^. carpet, 
towels, mirror and crockery; but students may providc^ ])(<! 
clothing, carpet, mirror and towels, fnr ^\ Imli they will iHailnwtfj 
a discount of $10.00 a year. Dressing bunniK may be rented 
at $1.00 a year for each student. 

■~^A1I rooms for young ladies are furnished with single enamel 
iron and brass bedsteads, felt mattreses and springs (for which 
one dollar a term is charged each student), wardrobe, dressing 
bureau, washstand, crockery, table, chairs, bookcase, and car- 
pet; but students may provide towels and bedding (for single 
bed) for which they will be allowed a discount of $5.00 a year. 

EXPENSES. 

Charges per school year for boarding, laundry, (12 plain 
pieces per week), heat, light, tuition in regular branches and 
room entirely furnished, are $250.00, distributed as follows : 

Fan Term $96.00 

Winter Term 77.00 

Spring Term 77.00 

$250.00 

Church Sittings — per term $ .50 

Gymnasium — per term 50 

Reading Room — per term 25 

Without tuition in any department : 

Fan Term $79.00 

Winter Term 63.00 

Spring Term 63.00 

We ask those who are seeking education for themselves, and 
parents who contemplate sending their children to a boarding 
school, to carefully note the fact that we furnish everything em- 
braced in a thoroughly equipped boarding school, with all the 
comforts of a good home, including a large, airy and complete- 
ly furnished room, in a beautiful and healthful location, in 
courses of study which prepare the student for business, for 
professional life, or for the lower or higher classes in college at 
the low rate of $250.00 a year. 



WII^UAMSPORT DICKINSON SEMINARY. 



13 



Persons applying for rooms will please state whether they 
wish them furnished entirely or in part. Rooms will not be 
furnished for less than a term. 

SiiKlont^ in riirniistrv arr c^lian/cd for 



Gent'ial Cliemistry per ttrrn 

<.^ualitaUve Analysis— per term [[ 4 uo 



* MO 



DlbLUUNTS. 

Special discounts are made on all bills, except tuition in Or- 
namental BranchesTwhen two enter from the same family at the 
same time ; to all Ministers ; all persons preparing for the Min- 
istry or Missionary work, and all who are preparing to teach. 

These discounts are credited at the close of each term, and 
may be withdrawn at any time if the scholarship and deport- 
ment of the beneficiary are not satisfactory. The bills of those 
receiving discounts must be paid or secured each term. 

PAYMENTS. 

Term bills are payable in advance, one-half at opening and 
the balance at the middle of the term. 

Twenty-five per cent, will be added to the ordinary rate per 
week for board, laundry, heat, light and room, when students 
leave before the end of the term. No reduction or discount in 
hoarding or tuition for less than half a term, nor furnished 
room for less than a term. Nor will there be any reduction for 
absence during a term except in case of protracted illness. 

Extra washing, ordinary pieces, 50 cents per dozen ; ladies' 
plain gowns, 20 cents each. 

Meals in dining room after regular table, 10 cents extra. Meals 
carried to rooms, in case of sickness, 10 cents each, or 25 cents 
per day. 

When students are called away by sickness or providential 
necessity, moneys advanced will be returned, subject to condi- 
tions stated above. Students dismissed or leaving without the 
approval of the President may be charged for the full term. 

No reduction for board or tuition for absence of tzvo weeks or 



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l^IFTY-FOURTH ANNUAL CATAtOGU^. 



less at the beginning, or the last four weeks before the close of 
the term. 

Fi/e dollars must be deposited by gentlemen and two dollars 
by ladies with the Treasurer on entering, io cover hiniaiji s tliai 
the students may do to the room or other propi rty. Ilns will 
be returned when the student leaves, but ii' t before, in case n«^ 
injury has been done. 

ADMISSION. 

Pupils of good moral character will be received at any time, 



for a single term or longer period. 

Must arrange bills with the Treasurer before attending reci- 
tations. 

Must take at least four studies, unless excused by the Fac- 
ulty. 

Must register and agree to comply with all rules and regula- 
tions of the school. 

Each student will be considered a member of the Institution 
until due notice shall have been given of intention to leave and 
l^ermission obtained from the President. 

BOARDING. 

This department is under the general direction of the Presi- 
dent, but an experienced and thoroughly competent Matron has 
immediate charge. The department commends itself by clean- 
liness, abundance of supply, excellence of quality, good cooking 
and adaptation to health. 

DISCIPLINE. 

The discipline is firm, but mild and impartial. While every 
encouragement will be given to the orderly and studious, and 
due allowance be made for youthful indiscretion, yet the lawless 
and refractory cannot long remain among us. 

MERIT AND DEMERIT. 

A daily record is kept of all the exercises of the school, from 
which record the student will be graded. A record of demerits 
is also kept. Tardiness, unexcused absences from required ex- 



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WII.I.IAMSPORT DICKINSON SKMINARY. 



15 



ercises, and all disorderly conduct, will subject the student to 
demerit marks. Such marks bring a private reproof before the 
Faculty, a public reprimand before the whole school, and may 
send the offender away. Sessional reports are sent to parents. 

GOVERNMENT. 

Our system of goveniiiient seeks lu encour;ige sell cnnirol 
rather than control by statute law and rule. It deals with mrb 
one as an individual, as well as a part of the school, making each 
one largely the arbiter of his own immunities and limitations. 
This principle will be emphasized in the coming year. 

Manliness and womanliness manifested in a uniform recogni- 
tion of relations to school and school life ; appreciation of what 
opportunity means as a value and factor in the acquisition of 
learning and culture, and courteous, straightforward, truthful 
dealing with teachers and fellow students in matters pertaining 
to mutual associations in the life and work of the school, will 
earn and obtain such privileges as properly consist with the 
purpose for which school life is desired and maintained. 

But indolence, evasion of duties implied in the relations of stu- 
dent and school, unmanly or unwomanly attitude toward the 
life assumed in entering the school, and especially equivocation 
or prevarication in statement, bearing or living, will be treat- 
ed as weakness or positive vice, imposing such correctives and 
limitations as each individual case may demand. 

HONORS. 

No student whose deportment is unsatisfactory will be al- 
lowed to contest for class honors. 

RELIGIOUS CHARACTER. 

Williamsport Dickinson Seminary is not sectarian in any 
sense, but it is positively and emphatically Christian in its ad- 
ministration and work. By combining practical Christian 
teaching with thorough intellectual training, under the person- 
al supervision of Christian men and women, especially qualified 
by education and experience, the school has established a repu- 



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FIFTY-FOURTH ANKUAL CATALOGUE. 



WM-"- 



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tation among literary institutions and has won the confidence 
of the public in a degree of which its friends and patrons may 
be justly proud. 

RELIGIOUS SERVICES. 

Every boarding student is required to attend religious ser- 
vices in the Chapel daily, as well as public worship morning 
and evening every Sabbath, at such place as parents or guar- 
dians may designate, the President assenting, unless excused. 

A Bible reading or special service conducted by the Presi- 
dent, will be substituted for the evening service as often as may 
be deemed proper. 

N. B. — Each student must be supplied with a Bible, to be 
read, ivithoiit note or sectarian comment, in the services of the 
Chapel. The whole school read in concert. 

To promote the spirit of worship, we advise each student to 
procure the Hymnal of the Methodist Episcopal Church, which 
is used in the Chapel services. 

A general experience meeting is held every Sabbath at half- 
past eight A. M., and generally a brief service of song at six P. 
M. Also a prayer and praise meeting on Wednesday evenings. 
Attendance upon these services is optional with the students. 

RELIGIOUS ORGANIZATIONS. 

A Young Woman's Foreign Missionary Society has been in 
successful operation for years. This society acquires and dif- 
fuses missionary intelligence, creates and maintains an inter- 
est in the work of the General Society, and prepares its mem- 
bers for efficient service as centres of Christian influence at their 
homes when school days are ended. It has largely contributed 
to the education of a missionary for India. 

The Young Men's and Young Women's Christian Associa- 
tions maintain brief devotional meetings daily, and on the Sab- 
bath each holds a special service of such character as circum- 
stances mav seem to demand. 



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WILLIAMSPORT DICKINSON SEMINARY. 



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HOME FEATURES. 

The Seminary is a boarding school of the highest grade, 
taking rank among the very best, with superior appointments 
and appliaiiccs foi (lie licaiih and culture oi Ub ^^ludnits. It is 
also a wrll- ordrrcil home. First ' : f ;il1, llie Presideiu nm] ]]]:\ 
fariiily ix-sulc 111 tlic building, lurnnii^i; :i pan of tiic scliuol, and 
nrc always accessible to all its nicniliers. 1 he wKv of the 
President entertains the Young Woman's Missiunary Society 
once a month in her apartments, and occasionally receives the 
entire school in her parlors, while in times of sickness she visits 
the students in their rooms, giving such suggestions and direc- 
tions as the experience of a mother may supply. Again, th^ 
members of the Faculty are so distributed throughout the 
building as to be readily accessible at any time for such help ai 
the students may desire outside of the recitation room. Again, 
recognizing the value of social culture as a factor in preparation 
for a useful life, the President and the Faculty give a formal 
reception once each term to the whole school in the Chapel, 
which for the occasion is transformed into an attractive draw- 
ing room, while weekly informal ''socials,'' continuing from 
thirty minutes to an hour, after the public Friday evening en- 
tertainments, relieve the monotony of routine work, cultivate a 
cheerful spirit and meet the natural desire for social pleasures. 
In these and all practicable ways an appeal is made to the high- 
er elements in the nature; mutual interest inspires mutual re- 
spect ; opportunity is afforded to study character, and the school 
becomes a pleasant and safe Christian home, as well as a place 
for careful mental and moral training. 

SPECIAL LECTURES. 

Special lectures in the form of familiar talks will be given 
each term by the President. These lectures will cover the dis- 
cussion of social ethics, the care of health, how to eat, how to 
work, how to play, how to rest, current literature and current 
events in relation to school life, with other subjects which may 
be helpful to young people who wish to make the most of op- 
portunity. 



i8 



FIFTY-FOURTH ANNUAI, CATAI.OGUK. 



The President will also give a course of lectures to young men 
preparing for the ministry, covering such themes as may be of 
value to them as preachers, as pastors and as citizens. Attend- 
ance at these lectures is required of all candidates for the min- 
istry. 

Lectures on current events, phases of school life and work, 
distinguished characters, science, literature, art, iravt I aih! kin- 
dred subjects, are given by members of the Faculty each Wed- 
nesday morning after Chapel services. 



YOUNG LADIES. 

Constant and systematic efforts are made looking toward the 
general culture of the young ladies committed to our care. The 
lady members of the Faculty take personal interest in all things 
pertaining to their welfare, and are intimately associated with 
them in recreation hours. 

Every Saturday short lectures are given to all young ladies 
on social culture, literature, art and kindred topics. 

Young ladies are chaperoned to and from church in the 
evenings, to entertainments, to games, to trains and on drives. 
They may only receive calls from gentlemen on written request 
from parents or guardians addressed to the President. 

INSTRUCTION. 

Our methods are modern, and adapted to the need of the stu- 
dents. No pains are spared to give thorough, practical and 
scholarly training in all departments by teachers of superior at-^ 
tainments and experience. Besides instruction in connection 
with the text book, lectures illustrated by experiments are given 
from time to time. 

Students in Music have opportunity to hear distinguished 
artists, which is of great advantage in acquiring a correct taste, 
as also in enlarging their knowledge. In addi- 
tion to frequent Recitals by musicians of recognized 
ability, eminent musicians from a distance frequently give con- 
certs, to which our Music pupils are admitted at reduced rates. 



WItUAMSPORT DICKINSON SEMINARY. 



19 



POST-GRADUATE WORK. 

We are prepared to do post-graduate work in Modern Lan- 
guages, Music, Art, Chemistry and Physics. 

LITERARY EXERCISES. 

In addiiiuii lu class work, |)ublic exercises are lielJ m the 
Seminary Chapel every Fridax evening, at \\1iio1i the Tniiiors 
aiiu Seniors in literary courses read essays or deliver original 
speeches, interspersed with vocal or instrumental music, fur- 
nished by the Music Department. 

LITERARY SOCIETIES. 

There are three flourishing Literary Societies connected with 
the Seminary — the Belles Lettres, the Gamma Epsilon and the 
Tripartite Union. The first two are in the gentlemen's and the 
last in the ladies' department. Each has a well furnished hall 
and a judiciously selected library, aggregating more than two 
thousand volumes. 

REFERENCE LIBRARY. 

By the generosity of Mr. Alexander E. Patton, a Director of 
the Seminary, the foundations of a Reference Library have been 
laid. Already many volumes, selected with intelligent discrim- 
ination, comprising the latest and best publications in the va- 
rious departments of History, Language, Literature, Science 
and Art, are accessible to all students. 

It is intended to make this library increasingly valuable, not 
so much by the number as by the quality of the books it contains. 
We appeal earnestly to all friends of the Seminary, and 
especially to former students, to send contributions in money or 
in books of standard value. No others are desired. 

Mrs. A. P. Dysart, the daughter of Rev. James Curns, do- 
nated one hundred and seventy volumes from her father's li- 
brary for such use as the President of the Seminary deemed 
best. These books are placed in the Reference Library and are 
designated the ''Rev. James Curns' Alcove." They are of 
special interest and value to young men preparing for the min- 
il^try. 



20 



FIFTY- I^OURTH ANNtTAL CATALOGUE. 



TEACHERS. 
If those preparing to teach desire it, a Normal Class will be 
organized during the Fall and Spring terms. The Course will 
comprehend special instruction by lectures on the Theory and 
Methods of Teaching by the i rcbideiii. No rrfm charge wiU 
be made. 

CANDIDATES FOR 1 iiE AI [NTSTRY. 
A preacher who can, when necessary, conduct the singing in 
___a prayer meeting and in a revival service, acquires a power for 
good which cannot otherwise be attained. Indeed, the useful- 
ness of a preacher is largely augmented by a knowledge of 
music and ability to sing. Recognizing this fact, we have ar- 
ranged ^ to give weekly lessons in singing and 
careful instruction in voice culture to all young men who 
are preparing to preach, at the nominal cost of one dollar per 
term. This provision also includes young women who are 
preparing for either home or foreign missionary work. 

STUDENTS OF LIMITED MEANS. 

We have organized a system by which a limited number of 
students may earn a part of the cost of education. 

We now give light employment, not appreciably interfering 
with study, to twenty-five young men and three young women, 
paying from ten to twenty-five per cent of the bills. Appli- 
cants for these positions are enrolled and vacancies are filled in 
the order of application, preference being given to those in the 
school. Applicants must be recommended by their pastor, or 
some responsible person, as worthy of help. No one will be re- 
tained who is not earnest in his studies and faithful to all re- 
quired duties. 

LOANS. 

Various Boards of Education accumulate beneficiary funds 
which are loaned to needy and worthy students upon recom- 
mendation of the home church and the approval of the Faculty. 

These loans are for a specified amount, without interest while 
the student is at work in this institution and for two years after- 
wards. 



\ 



WILUAMSPORT DICKINSON SEMINARY. 



21 



ADVICE TO PARENTS. 

1. Try to have your children here on the first day of the term. 
but not before, as we shall not be ready to receive them. The 
classes are formed cm Hie second day, aiwl it will 1m heftrr fnr nil 
conceiiird ihai ilic student start rcgidarl)' with liis class. 

2. If possible, du not call tliciii away during tlie session. 
When called home during the term, the time of goine; and re- 
turning must be specified in the request. Absence, if only for 
a few days, disarranges the class, and is generally the beginning 
of irregularity on the part of the student. 

3. Do not allow your children to leave the school before the 
examinations, unless it cannot be avoided. Serious inconven- 
ience to all concerned often arises from a neglect of this caution. 

4. Supply them very sparingly with spending money. 
Parents cannot be too cautious on this point. 

5. Select for your child one of the instructors as a patron, to 

distribute his funds. In this way a more judicious use of 

your money will be made, and your child will be kept from 

many temptations. 

OUTFIT. 

The gentlemen should be provided with an umbrella, and also 
a pair of slippers to be worn in the room. The ladies must be 
supplied with thick walking shoes, and umbrella, India rubber 
overshoes, water-proof cloak and a suit for exercise in the Gym- 
nasium. Their attire for general use should be neat and simple, 
but not elegant or expensive. All wearing apparel must he 
plainly maked with full name of the owner. We suggest that 
in addition to towels, napkins and napkin ring, each pupil bring 
a knife, fork and spoon, for use in case of sickness, 

DAY PUPILS. 

A large, well-lighted, well-ventilated study room, properly 
furnished with desks, is provided for our day pupils. 

Recitations will not be heard in this room, but a thoroughly 
competent person will have charge during the school hours of 



22 



FIFTY-FOURTH ANNUAI. CATALOGUE. 



the day and direct students in their work, giving especial atten- 
tion to backward pupils and those who have not learned how to 
study. 

Day pupils in the Primary branches will 1m - har^Ki $io 50 
for Fall Term and $8.00 for Winter and bpi mu iciins each , m 
higher branches $21.00 for Fall Term :m 1 $17.00 for Winter 
and Spring Terms each. 

All day students pursuing regular studies will be required to 



observe the following rules : 

1. Attend Chapel exercises, unless excused by the President. 

2. Spend the intervals between recitations in the study room. 

3. Present written excuse from parent or guardian for all 
absences. 

4. Must not visit the rooms of boarders without permission. 

5. Must deposit $1.00 with the Treasurer of the Seminary 
when they enter to cover damage to Study Hall or other prop- 
erty. This will be returned when the student leaves, but not 
before, provided no injury has been done. 

EXAMINATIONS. 

Students who make a term record of eighty per centum and 
upward in all subjects will not be required to take examinations 
in those subjects in which they have made a term record of 
ninety per centum and upward ; but if the term standing in any 
subject falls below eighty per centum examinations will be re- 
quired in all subjects pursued during the term. 

APPARATUS. 

The Scientific Department is furnished with very complete 
outfits of Physical and Chemical Apparatus. The new Chem- 
cial Laboratory meets a long-felt want in this department. A 
large room, with the best light, has been fitted with the most 
approved modern appliances for Qualitative Analysis. Sixteen new 
desks, each furnished with gas, sink and water, aflford every ad- 
vantage for individual work by the student. 



ik 



WIIvLIAMSPORT DICKINSON SEMINARY. 



23 



In the Museum — 

Alcoholic specimens of the Human Heart, Brain, Stomach 
Kidneys and Intestines. 

Bock-Steger Models of Ear, Skin, Eye, Laryax, Alimentary 
Canal, Lungs, Heal, lira in and 1 niigue. 

A finelv articulated ITnman Skrlcton is accessible to the 
classes in Physiology and Anatomy. A valuaijk i^ullcction of 
Microscopic slides has been presented for the use of the De- 
partment. 

A series of Drill ores, a collection of different Woods in 
the form of blocks, showing bark, grain and finished surface, 
and a collection of Polished Granite specimens. 

In Physical Apparatus — 

A Holtz Machine, Gold Leaf Electroscopes, Pith Ball Elec- 
troscopes, Ruhmkorff Coil, Morse Key and Register, a model 
Telegraphing Machine, a Queen's Superior Air Pump; two 
large Globes, Still, furnishing distilled water for all work in 
Chemistry, Oxyhydrogen Light with all accessories, a Queen's 
Excelsior Lantern, two Dynamos and a Camera. 

In Chemical Apparatus — 

Pair Delicate Balances, sensitive to one milligram. Assay Fur- 
nace, full set of Pipetts, Buretts and Graduates for Volumetric 
Analysis. 

In the study of Botany — 

A large collection of rare Botanical specimens, gathered in 
Kentucky and mounted for use. 

ENDOWED SCHOLARSHIPS. 

Many young men and women, with large capacity for use- 
fulness, and ambitious to acquire an education, are limited in 
means. Comparatively little help, with such aid as the Semi- 
nary affords to worthy students, would suffice to supplement 
their resources. The interest on one thousand dollars, and in 
many instances the interest on half that sum, would inspire hope 
and stimulate the spirit of sacrifice in families and among 



24 



FIFTY-FOURTH ANNUAI, CATALOGUE. 



friends that would secure to many young men and women of 
excellent promise, the mental training and moral culture of the 
Seminary. 

This institution will be glad to accept cihiDutiJ scliolarship^ 
of any amount which may be constituted in ilu fdllowiiig man- 
ner: 

1. The founder of each scholarship si i ill have the privilege 
of naming it and of determining the conditions on which it shall 

^ be awarded. 

2. These scholarships may be maintained from year to year 
by the annual payment of the interest on the principal sum until 
the principal sum is paid. 

3. The income of a scholarship when not awarded shall be 
at the disposal of the President and Board of Directors. 

4. Applicants for a scholarship must present satisfactory tes- 
timonials of good moral character, and, to retain it, if awarcjed, 
must do satisfactory work. 

Mr. DeWitt Bodine, of Hughesville, Pa., an alumnus of the 
Seminary, has the honor of founding the first full scholarship in 
this institution. It is to be filled from the public schools of 
Hughesville by competitive examinations and is designated 

'The DeWitt Bodine Scholarship/' 

It pays all expenses of board, tuition, etc., in any regular 
course of study. 

Who will imitate Mr. Bodine's example? Are there not 
generous men and women among our alumni and friends ready 
to invest a portion of their wealth where it will be secure and 
work for God forever? Any sum will help, and three thousand 
five hundred dollars will found a ministry or missionary schol- 
arship in this Institution and maintain it perpetually. 

The Alexander E. Patton Scholarship. 

Mr. Alexander E. Patton, of Curwensville, Pa., has founded 
a perpetual scholarship of one thousand dollars, the conditions 
of which are, that the interest on this sum shall be paid annually 



H 
I 

m 

H 
C 
D 



V 




WILI.IAMSPORT DICKINSON SEMINARY. 



25 



in equal amounts to the two applicants who rank highest in 
scholarship and deportment in the Junior class. 

The Elizabeth S. Jackson Scholarship. 

Mrs. Elizabeth S. Jackson, of Berwick, Pa., has founded a 
perpetual scholarship of five hundred dollars, the con'liti«ms of 
which are, that the interest on this sum shaii be paid aiinuaily 
to the applicant who ranks highest in scholarship and deport- 
ment in the Sophomore class. 

The William L. Woodcock Scholarship. 

Mr. William L. Woodcock, of Altoona, Pa., has founded a 
perpetual scholarship of five hundred dollars^ the conditions of 
which are, that the interest on this sum shall be paid annually to 
the applicant who ranks second in scholarship and deportment 
in the Sophomore class. 

The Edward J. Gray Scholarship. 

The President of the Seminary has founded a perpetual 
scholarship of one thousand dollars, the conditions of which are, 
that the interest on this sum shall be paid annually, in equal 
amounts, to the two applicants who rank highest in scholarship 
and deportment in the Senior class. 

The Baltimore Scholarship. — The Woman's College of 
Baltimore extends to this Seminary the privilege of awarding 
annually to a lady graduate a scholarship of the cash value of 
five hundred ($500.00) dollars, entitling her to a four years' 
course of study in that College. 

The selection of the incumbent shall be made upon the nomi- 
nation of the President of the faculty of the institution from 
those young ladies, members of the graduating class, who shall 
have entered their names as competitors for the scholarship 
previous to the examination, and who shall be able to enter the 
Freshman Class without conditions. 

Contestants for these scholarships must register not later than 
the close of the Winter term. 

To aid anv one who may desire by gift or will to found a par- 



26 



KIFTY-FOURTH ANNUAL CATALOGUE. 



c 



tial or full scholarship to assist worthy young men or women 
in preparing for the ministry or mission work, or for any other 
useful occupation, forms are appended which may be used : 

I give, bequeath and devise to the Williamspor! Dirl<inson 
Seminary, located at Williamsport, in the county of Lycoming, 
state of Pennsylvania, the sum of dollars (if stocks, 

bonds or other personal property specify same), to be used for 
the purpose of (here state definitely the object for which the 
money or property is to be used) ; said corporation to have and 
to hold and to employ the same for the purpose above named, 
and the receipt of the treasurer thereof shall be a sufficient dis- 
charge to my executors for the same. 

If real estate is to be given, this form will answer: I give, 
bequeath and devise to the Williamsport Dickinson Seminary, 
located at Williamsport, in the county of Lycoming, state of 
Pennsylvania, the following lands and premises (here describe 
definitely), to have and to hold, to said corporation, its succes- 
sors and assigns forever, the proceeds of which shall be em- 
ployed in (here describe the object). 

MEANS OF ACCESS. 

Williamsport is eight and a-half hours from New York, six 
hours from Philadelphia, nine hours from Pittsburg, six hours 
from Baltimore, three hours from Harrisburg, and three hours 
from Elmira, and is reached directly by the Pennsylvania, the 
Philadelphia & Reading, the Northern Central, the Philadel- 
phia & Erie, the New York Central railroads, which pass 
through the city, and as these have connections directly with all 
the great railroads, is readily accessible from all quarters. 

GRADUATES AND FORMER STUDENTS. 

It may be safely estimated that from ten to twelve thousand 
persons have received Academic instruction, covering from one 
to four years, in Williamsport Dickinson Seminary, while nine 
hundred and twelve have completed the prescribed curriculum, 
graduating with the degrees the Institution confers. We desire 
to bring al) tbe3q into active sympathy and co-operation with 



WILLIAMSPORT DICKINSON SEMINARY. 



27 



their Alma Mater, and hence we ask all persons to whom this 
notice may come, who have been students here, to send us their 
address, with any information concerning their personal his- 
tory thai iiiciy be of gen(M;il uiieiLbi, as we wibh lu cuiiipilc a 
complete catalogue of all ilic students now living. 

Tlirre is a general nic rting of the Almnni every yrar, \hc day 
before Commencement. We extend a most cordial iii\ iiatiuii to 
all old students to attend the meeting this year, which will be 
held June 18, in the afternoon and evening. If you cannot 
come, let us hear from you by letter. 

And now, may we not ask you to aid in enlarging the sphere 
and increasing the power of our Alma Mater? You can do 
much in many ways, but you can at least direct those looking 
for a good boarding school to ours, or send us their address on 
a postal card. Carry the Seminary in your heart. She is do- 
ing a worthy work, and earnestly asks her sons and daughters 
to help her. 



I 



28 



FIFTY-FOURTH ANNUAL CATALOGUE. 



SPECIAL INFORMATION. 



We shall not be ready to receive students before the first day 
of the term. On the second day classes are formed, a term 
schedule for recitations adopted, and lessons assigned. 



School duties, five days in the week, are assigned as follows : 
6.30 A. M., rising bell ; 7.00 A. M., breakfast ; 8 100-9.20 A. M., 
recitations; 9.20-9.40 A. M., Chapel; 9.40 A. M.-12.20 P. M., 
recitations; 12. 20-1-20 P. M., lunch hour; 1.20-4.00 P. M., reci- 
tations; 4.00-5.40 P. M., recreation; 5.40-6.20 P. M., dinner; 
6.20-7.00 P. M., Sept. -April, recreation ; 6.20-7.30 P. M., May- 
June, recreation; 7.00-9.40 P. M., study; 10 P. M., retiring 
bell. 

Students from other schools may enter any class on passing 
a satisfactory examination in the previous studies of the Course 
or their equivalents. The examination may be waived if the 
Faculty are assured, by certificates of scholarship or otherwise, 
that it is unnecessary. Certificates must be presented within 
tzvo weeks after admission. 

Invitation to visit any member of the school may be given 
only with the approval of the President. The person inviting 
or entertaining a visitor will be charged twenty-five cents per 
meal, which must be paid when the visitor leaves. Parents or 
brothers or sisters of the person inviting will be entertained one 
day without charge. 

Visitors will not be allowed on the halls nor in the rooms of 
students without permission. 

Students who are back in more than three studies in any year 
will not rank with the class of that year vuiless they have com- 
pleted equivalent advanced studies. 

German, covering two years, may be substituted for Greek in 
the College Preparatory Course. 



WILLIAMSPORT DICKINSON SEMINARY. 



2g 



The language ''elected" in the Courses of Science and Liter- 
ature and Practical Science will be retained throughout the re- 
quired two years. 

The ladies are allowed to substitute a course in Music, Draw- 
ing and Painting, German or French, for Greek and for Analy- 
tical Geometry and Calculus. 

The gentlemen may substitute two years in Greek or German 
for Analytical Geometry and Calculus. 

The election or substitution of German, French, Music or 
Drawing and Painting does not remit the regular tuition for 
these branches. 

Orthography, Etymology, Reading, Composition and Decla- 
mation are required of all students, except those exclusively in 
Music, Art and Elocution. 

In the departments of Ancient and Modern Languages the 
classes are practiced in oral and written exercises throughout 
the Course. 

The study of the English Bible, one lesson a week, is required 
in all Literary Courses. 

Essays by the young women and speeches by the young men, 
one each term, delivered at the regular Friday evening exercises, 
are required as a part of the Literary Courses in the Junior and 
Senior vears. 



30 



FIFTY-FOURTH ANNUAL CATALOGUE. 



COUl' 



>*. 



I I 



IJD^ 



In order to meet the wants of a larger class of students, ten regu- 
lar Courses of Study are provided, namfly Tli«^ Normal Englisli 
Belles Lettres, Science and Literature, Classical, Practical Science, 
College Preparatory, Art, Piano, Voice and Expression. Students 
may adopt any of these Courses exclusively, or may select such 
studies from them as they desire, subject to the approval of the 
Faculty. 



\^ 



The Normal English Course is designed to meet the increasing de- 
mand for teachers in our Common Schools, and is heartily com- 
mended to young ladies and gentlemen who desire thorough instruc- 
tion and drill in the English Branches. 

The Belle Lettres Course is especially arranged to accommodate 
young ladies who may wish to omit the Higher Mathematics beyond 
Elementary Algebra and Geometery. It thus affords opportunity to 
connect studies in Music and Art with a well-selected Course in Lit- 
erature and Science. 

The Course in Science and Literature is intended to give wider 
culture and more thorough mental discipline. It differs from the 
Classical Courses mainly in that it omits the Greek Language entire- 
ly, and makes Latin elective with German or French during the first 
two years. Before entering upon this Course the student must be 
thoroughly acquainted with the Common English Branches. 

The Classical Course is much more extensive than is ordinarily 
pursued at Seminaries. It will compare favorably with the Curricu- 
lum adopted by our best institutions of learning. We offer it with 
entire confidence to young men who are preparing for professional 
life; also to young ladies who aspire to superior intellectual culture. 
The preparation for this Course is a thorough knowledge of the 
studies embraced in the Academic Course. 

The Practical Science Course covers the required preparation for 
admission to schools of Technology and to Industrial Courses in our 
best Universities and Colleges. However, it is especially arranged 
to meet the increasing demands for scientific and literary instruc- 
tion by those who contemplate an Academic training. As a prepara- 
tion for assured success in industrial occupations we heartily com- 
mend it. 

The College Preparatory Course is arranged for those who desire 
thorough instruction and systematic drill in all branches requisite 
for admission to our best Colleges and Universities. We commend 
it especially to parents who wish to place their children under the 
watchful care of experienced teachers, while they receive the liter- 
ary culture of a high-grade institution of learning and enjoy the so- 
cial advantages of a well-regulated Christian home. 



WILLIAMSPORT DICKINSON SEMINARY. 



31 



ACADEMIC COURSE. 

This Course will give thorough instruction and drill in the Common English 
Branches and also prepare the Student for admission to the higher Courses. Classes 
are formed eRoh trrm f r I eginning and advanced Students in Arithmetic, Grammar, 
Geography, liisloiy, Algebra, Geometry and Latin. 

FIRST vp:ar. 



}' ALL TltRM 



Winter Term 



Spring Term 



Fai,!, Term 



Winter Term 



Spring Term 



r Aritlimclir, i Miliic.) 
i (jratniiiar, (^Harvey.) 
i^ Creoj^raphy, (Red way & Hinman.) 

Anthiiiotic, (Milne.) 
Grammar, (Harvey.) 
Geography and Map Drawing, (Redway & Hinman. ) 

Arithmetic, (Milne.) 
Grammar, (Harvey.) 
Geography and Map Drawing, (Redway & Hinman.) 

SECOND YEAR. 

Arithmetic, (Milne.) 
Algebra, (Milne — Elements.) 
Grammar, (Harvey.) 
lyatm, (Smiley & Storke. ) 
Bool-Vpeping — optional. 

Arithmetic, Mental and Written, (Milne.) 
Algebra, (Milne — Elements.) 
Grammar, (Harvey.) 
History, United States, (Montgomery.) 
Latin, (Smiley & Storke.) 
Bookkeeping — optional. 

Arithmetic Reviewed. 

English Composition, (Welch.) 

Latin — Caesar — (Grammar, Allen & Greenough.) 

History, United States, (Montgomery.) 



\ 



NORMAL ENGLISH COURSE. 

Thi3 Course is designed to accommodate young men and women whose time for 
school is limited, and especially those who are preparing to teach in our Common 
Schools. A Diploma will be given to those who complete the Course, 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. 

' Arithmetic, Written and Mental, (Milne.) 
English Grammar, (Harvey.) 
Geography, (Redway & Hinman.) 
Civil Government, (Young.) 
English. 

Arithmetic, Written and Mental, (Milne.) 

Algebra, to Factoring, (Milne — Academic.) 

English Grammar, (Harvey.) 

Geography and Map Drawing, (Redway & Hinman.) 

History, American, (Montgomery.) 

English. 



Fai,i, Term : 



Winter Term : 



32 



I^II^TY-FOtfRTM ANNUAL CATALOGUE. 



Spring Term : 



Arithmetic, Written and Mental, (Milne.) 

Algebra, Factoring to Simple Equations, (Milne — 

English Grammar, (Harvey.) [Academic.) 

History, American, (Montgomery.) 

English. 

JUMOi: VI{,\R. 

Physical Geo^iajihy, (Gilbert vK: fiiighatn.) 
Algebra, Equations to ivxponcnts, (Milne Aca- 
Pliysiology, Bi icier cOursc, (Colton.) [demic. ) 

Latin, (Smiley & Sti^ike. ) 
English. 

Rhetoric, (Genung. ) 



Fall Tkrm : 



i 



Winter Term : 



V. 



Spring Term : 



Fai,l Term : 



Winter Term 



Spring Term : 



Algebra, Exponents to Ratio and Proportion, (Milne 
Latin, (Smiley & Storke.) [Academic.) 

English. 

Rhetoric, (Genung.) 

Geometry, Books I. and II., (Milne.) 

Latin — Caesar — (Grammar, Allen & Greenough.) 

Arithmetic Reviewed. 

English. 

SENIOR YEAR. 

English History, (Higginson & Channing.) 

American Literature, (Pattee. ) 

Physics, (Gage.) 

Latin — Caesar — (Grammar, Allen & Greenough.) 

English. 

History, General, (Myers.) 

English Literature, (Pancoast.) 

Psychology, (Halleck.) 

Physics, (Gage.) 

Theory and Methods of Teaching — Weekly Lectures. 

English. 

Psychology, (Halleck.) 

English Literature, (Pancoast.) 

Botany, (Leavitt. ) 

History, General, (Myers.) 

Theory and Methods of Teaching — Weekly Lectures. 

English. 



COURSE IN SCIENCE AND LITERATURE. 

upon completing the following Course the Student will be entitled to the Degree 
of Bachelor of Science. Those not wishing to take the whole Course can pursue such 
studies as they desire, subject to the action of the Faculty. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. 

English History, (Higginson & Channing.) 

Physical Geography, (Gilbert & Brigham. ) 

Civil Government, (Young.) [demic.) 

Algebra, Equations to Exponents, (Milne — Aca- 

Latin, (Smiley & Storke.) 

German. 

French. 

English. 



Fall Term 



^ Elective. 



<, 



i 



t 



m 

z 

o 

CD 
> 

m 

H 

CD 
> 

r 
r 

H 

m 
> 




32 



FlFTY-1 OURTH ANNUx\I. CATALOGUE. 



r 



Spring Term : 



FAI.L Tkrm : 



Winter Term 



Spring Term : 



Fall Term : 



\Vinti:r Term 



Sprinc; Term : 



I 



I 



I 



f 



Arithmetic, Written and Mental, (Milne.) 

Algebra, Factoring to Simple Equations, (Milne — 

Kiiglish Grammar, (Harvey-) [Academic.) 

History, American, (Montgomery.) 

English. 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

Physical Geography, (Gilbert & Brigham.) 
Algebra, Equations to Exponents, (Milne — Aca- 
Physiology, Briefer Course, (Colton.) [demic. ) 

Latin, (Smiley & Storke. ) 
English. 

Rhetoric, (Genung. ) 

Algebra, Exponents to Ratio and Proportion, (Milne 

Latin, (Smiley «Sc Storke.) [Academic.) 

English. 

Rhetoric, (Genung.) 

Geometry, Books I. and II., (Milne.) 

Latin — Caesar — (Grammar, Allen & Greeuough.) 

Arithmetic Reviewed. 

English. 

SENIOR YEAR. 

English History, (Higginson & Channing. ) 

American Literature, (Pattee. ) 

Physics, (Gage.) 

Latin — Cx'sar — (Grammar, Allen & Greenough.) 

English. 

History, General, (Myers.) 

English Literature, (Pancoast.) 

Psychology, (Halleck.) 

Physics, (Gage. ) 

Theory and Methods of Teaching — Weekly Lectures. 

English. 

Psychology, (Halleck.) 

English Literature, (Pancoast.) 

Botany, (Leavitt. ) 

History, General, (Myers.) 

Theory and Methods of Teaching — Weekly Lectures. 

English. 



COURSE IN SCIENCE AND LITERATURE. 

upon completing the following Conrse the vStndent will be entitled to the Degree 
of Bachelor of vScience, Those not wishing to take the whole Course can pursue such 
studies as they desire, subject to the action of the Faculty. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. 

English History, (Higginson & Channing.) 
Physical Geography, (Gilbert & Hrighani. ) 
Civil Government, (Young.) ((letnic.) 

^ ^p J Algebra, Eciuations to Exponents, (Milne — Aca- 

hALLlERM: , i^Qtin^ (Smiley cS: Storke.) | 

German. [ Elective. 

French. J 

English. 



C/5 

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WILUAMSPORT DICKINSON SEMINARY. 



33 



History, General, (Myers.) 

Rhetoric, (Geuung. ) 

Algebra, Exponents to Ratio and Proportion, (Milne 

Geometry, Books I. and II., (Milne.) [Academic.) 

Latin, (Smiley & Storke.) ] 

('rennai! |- 1C!( (tive. 

P^rcncli. J 



Winter Term : 



'^■, 



Spring Term : 



Fai.1. Term : 



Winter Term 



Spring Term : 



Fai,!:, Term : 



Winter Term 



i 



I 



Elective, 



Elective. 



History, General, . .Myers.) 

Rhetoru , (Genung. ) 

AlLH-l'ia, complete, (Milne — Academic.) 

Geometry, Books III. -VI., (Milne.) 

Ivatin — Csesar — (Grammar, Allen & ] 

German. [Greenough.) [ Elective. 

French. 

English. 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

American I^iterature, (Pat tee.) 

Physiology, (Colton.) 

Physics, (Gage.) 

Geometry, Books VII. and VIII., (Milne.) 

Latin — Csesar — (Grammar, Allen & 

German. [Greenough. ) 

French. 

English. 

English Literature, (Pancoast. ) 

Physics, (Gage.) 

Trigonometry, (Wentworth.) 

Latin — Virgil — (Greenough.) 

German. 

French. 

English. 

Botany, (Leavitt.) 

Political Economy, (Walker.) 

English Literature, (Pancoast.) 

Surveying, (Wentworth.) 

Latin — Virgil — (Greenough. ) 

German. 

French. 

English. 

SENIOR YEAR. 

Moral Science. 

Geology, (Brigham.) 

Astronomy, (Todd.) 

Latin — Virgil — (Greenough. ) 

Analytical Geometry, (Wentworth.) 

English. 

Logic. 

Chemistry — with Lectures, (Remsen.) 

Psychology, (Halleck.) 

Latin — Cicero — Orations I. -IV., (Cati- 

Calculus, (Taylor.) [line.) 

English. 



' Elective. 



I Elective. 



y Elective. 



34 



FII^TY-FOURTH ANNUAL CATALOGUE. 



WILLIAMSPORT DICKINSON SEMINARY. 



35 



Spring Term : 



' Psychology, (Halleck.) 
Chemistry — with Lectures, (Remsen.) 
Biology, (Sedgwick & Wilson.) 
Latin — Cicero — four selected Orations, 
Calculus, (Taylor.) 
English. 



I ^^ 



ective. 



Spring Term : 



History, General, (Myers.) 
English Literature, (Pancoast. ) 
Botany, (Leavitt.) 
Latin — Virgil — ( Greenough. ) 

Gei Hiaii. 



Elective. 



BELLES LETTRES COURSE. 



Fai.1. Term : 



Fai^i, Term : 



Upon completing this Course the Student will be entitled to the Degree of Mistress 
of English Literature — M. E. L- 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. 

English History, (Higginson & Channing. ) 
English Composition, (Welch.) 
Arithmetic, (Milne.) 
^ Latin, (Smiley & Storke.) ] 

German. \ Elective. 

French. J 

English. 

American History, (Montgomery.) 

Rhetoric, (Genuug. ) 

Algebra, to Factoring, (Milne — Academic.) 

Latin, (Smiley & Storke.) 

German. 

French. 

English. 

American History, (Montgomery.) 

Rhetoric, (Genung. ) [Academic.) 

Algebra, Factoring to Simple Equations, (Milne — 

Latin — Caesar — (Grammar, Allen & 

German. [Greenough.) 

French. 

English. 



Winter Term 



Spring Term : 



i 



Frcncli. 
Kiiglislr 

SKNIOR \'HAR. 

Moral Science. 
Geology, ( Hrighfttii.) 
Astronomy, (Todd.) 
Physics, (Gage.) 
English. 

Psychology, (Halleck.) 

Logic. 

Chemistry — with Lectures, (Remsen.) 

Physics, (Gage.) 

English. 

Psychology, (Halleck.) 
Chemistry — with Lectures, (Remsen.) 
Biology, (Sedgwick & Wilson.) 
[ English. 



Winter Term 



Elective. 



Spring Term 



Elective. 



Fali. Term : 



Winter Term 



Fall Term : 



\ 



Winter Term 



junior YEAR. 

American Literature, (Pattee. ) 

Physiology, (Colton.) 

Civil Government, (Young.) 

Latin — Caesar — (Grammar, Allen & 

German. [Greenough.) \ Elective. 

French. 

English. 

History, General, (Myers.) 

English Literature, (Pancoast.) 

Geometry, Rooks I. and XL, (Milne.) 

Latin — Virgil — (Greeiiongli. ) 

German. 

French. 

English. 



Elective. 



COLLEGE PREPARATORY COURSE. 

This Course is arranged for those who desire to prepare for admission to any 
American College or University. Students may enter at any point for which they 
are prepared. Those completing the Course will receive a Diploma. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. ^ 

Latin, (Smiley & Storke.) 

English Composition, (Welch. )^ ,/ 

English History, (Higginson & Channing.) 

English^ 

Latin*, ( Smiley & Storke. ) 

Algebra, to Factoring, (Milne — Academic.) 

Rhetoric, ( Genung. V 

American History, (Montgomery. ) 

English. 

Latin — Caesar, 29 chapters^ — (Grammar, Allen & 

Greenough. ) 
Algebra, Factoring to Simple Equations, (Milne — 
Rhetoric, (Genung.) [Academic.) 

American History, (Montgomery.) 
English. , 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

Latin — Caesar, completing Books I. and II., (Gram- 
mar, Allen & Greenough.) [Goodwin.) 
Greek — First Greek Boo^, (White.) (Grammar, 
Algebra, Equations to Exponents, (Milne — Aca- 
Physics, (Gage.) [demic. ) 
English. 



Spring Term : 



Fall, Term : 



36 



i^IFXY-FOURTH ANNUAL CATALOGUE. 



Winter Term 



Spring Tkrm 



Fai^l Term : 



Winter Term : 



Spring Term : 



Latin — Virgil, Book I. and Scansion, (Greenough. ) 
Greek — First Greek Book, (White.) (Grammar, 
Physics, (Gage.)i ^ [Goodwin.) 

Algebra, Exponents to Ratio niid Proportion, (Milne 
Geometry — Books I. and II., (Milne.) [Academic.) 
English. 

Latin— Caesar, Books III. and IV. 

Latin — Virgil, Books II. and Illi, (Greenough.) 

Greek — Anabasis, 8 chapters, (Goodwin.) 

Geometry— Books III.-VI., (Milne.) 

Roman History, (Myers.) 

English. 

SENIOR YEAR. 

Latin — Virgil, Books IV. -VI., (Greenough.) 
Latin — Prose Composition, (Collar.) [win.) 

Greek — Anabasis, complete Books I. and II., (Good- 
Geometry— Solid, Books VII. and VIII.v,^( Milne.) 
English. 

Latin — Cicero — Catiline Orations, (Allen & Green- 
ough. ) 
Greek — Anabasis, Books III. and IV., (Goodwin.) 
Greek — Iliad, Book I., (Seymour.) 
Greek History, (Myers.) 
English. 

Latin — Cicero, (Pro Archia and three others.) 

Latin — Virgil — Bucolics and Ovid. 

Greek — Iliad, Books II. and III., (Seymour.) 

Greek Prose, (Harper & Castle.) 

Classical Geography, (Tozer) — with Ginn's Atlas. 

English. 



Fali* Term : 



CLASSICAL COURSE. 

Upon completing the following Course the Student will be entitled to the Degree 
of Bachelor of Arts. Those not wishing to complete the Course can pursue such 
studies as they desire, subject to the action of the Faculty. 

FRESHMAN YEAR. 

Latin — Beginner's Book, (Smiley & Storke.) 

Civil Government, (Young.) 

English History, (Higginson & Channing. ) 

English. 

Latin — Beginner's Book, (Smiley & Storke.) 
Algebra, to Factoring, (Milne — Academic.) 
Greek History, (Myers.) 
English. 

Latin — C?esar, Book I., 29 chapters, ( Harper & Tol- 
man. ) [Academic.) 

Algebra, Factoring to Simple Equations, (Milne — 
Roman History, (Myers.) 
English. 



Winter Term : 



Spring Term : 



WILLIAMSPORT DICKINSON SEMINARY. 



37 



• 



FalIv Term : 



Winter Term 



V 



Spring Term 



Fai,!, Term : 



Winter Term : 



Spring Term : 



FaiJv Term : 



Winter Term 



(Milne — Aca- 
[demic. ) 



i 



r 



\ 



I 



SOPHOMORE YEAR. 
Latin— Ccesar, Books I. and II., (Harper & Tolman.) 
Greek— First Greek Book, (White.) 
Algebra, Equations to Exponents, 
Physiology, (Colton.) 
English. 

Latin — Virgil, Book I., (Greenough.) 

Greek— First Greek Book, (White.) 

Algebra, Exponents to Ratio and Proportion, (Milne 

Geometry, Books I. and II., (Milne.) [Academic.) 

Rhetoric, (Genung. ) 

English. 

Latin — Virgil, Book II., (Greenough.) 

Greek — Anabasis, 8 chapters. 

Algebra, complete, (Milne — Academic.) 

Geometry, Books IIL-VI., (Milne.) 

Rhetoric, (Genung.) 

English. 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

Latin— Virgil, Books IV. -VI. 

Greek — Anabasis, complete, Books I. and II. 

Geometry— Solid, Books VII. and VIII., (Milne.) 

Ph3^sics, (Gage.) 

English. 

Latin — Cicero, Orations I. -IV., (Catiline.) 

Greek — Iliad, Book I. 

Trigonometry, (Wentworth.) 

Physics, (Gage.) 

Etiglish Literature, (Pancoast.) 

English. 

Latin — Cicero, four selected Orations. 
Greek — Iliad, Books II. and III. 
vSurveying, (Wentworth.) > ^i^^tive 

Political Economy, (Walker.) ) 
Kiiglish Literature, (Pancoast.) 
English. 



'abilia. f 



Elective. 



Elective. 



SENIOR YEAR. 

Latin — Horace. 

Greek — Xenophon Memoral 

Moral Science. 

Geology, (Brigham.) 

Astronomy, (Todd.) 

Analytical Geometry, (Wentworth.) 

Latin— Livy. ^ Elective 
Greek— Plato.) ^1^^"^^- 

Logic. 

Psychology, (Hallcck.) 

Chemistry — with Lectures, (Remsen.)| -r*, «f:„- 

Calculus, (Taylor.) | l^lective. 



38 



FIFTY- FOURTH ANNUAI. CATALOGUE. 



^ Latin — Tacitus. 



Spring Term : 



ivatin— Tacitus. > 

Greek— Sophocles and Antigone. J ^^^ctive. 
Psychology, (Halleck.) 

Chemistry— with Lectures, (Remsen.) 1 ^, ,. 
Calculus, (Taylor.) | ^^^cti 



Fall Term 



Elective. 



Winter Term 



Elective. 



PRACTICAL SCIENCE COURSE. 

Upon completing this Course the Student will receive the Degree of Bachelor of 
.Elements. — .^- — 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. 

English History, (Higginson & Channing.) 

Physical Geography, (Gilbert & Brigham.) 

Civil Government, (Young.) 

Latin, (Smiley & Storke.) 

German. 

French. 

Free-hand Drawing — twice a week. 
English. 

' History, General, (Myers.) 
Rhetoric, (Genung.) 

Algebra, to Factoring, (Milne— Academic.) 
Latin, (Smiley & Storke.) ^ 
German. 
French. 

Free-hand Drawing — twice a week. 
. English. 

History, General, (Myers.) 

Rhetoric, ( Genung. ) [demic. ) 

Algebra, Factoring to Equations, (Milne— Aca- 

Latin— Caesar, (Grammar, Allen & ] 

German. [Greenough.) [ Elective. 

French. j 

Free-hand Drawing — twice a week. 
English. 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

Physiologv, (Colton.) 

Physics, (Gage.) [demic.) 

Algebra, Equations to Exponents, (Milne— Aca- 

Latin— Caesar, (Grammar, Allen & ~ 

German. [Greenough. ) 

French. 

English. 

Physics, (Gage.) 

Geometry, Books I. and II., ( Milne. ) [Academic. ) 

Algebra, Exponents to Ratio and Proportion, (Milne 

Latin— Virgil, (Greenough.) ^ 

German. 

French. 

English. 



Spring Term 



Fall Term 



- Elective. 



WiNTKR Term 



- Elective, 



WILLIAMSPORT DICKINSON SEMINARY. 



39 



Spring Term : 



Political Economy, (Walker.) 
Botany, (Leavitt.) 
Geometry, Books III. -VI., (Milne.) 
Latin — Virgil, (Greenough.) 

Gei ir.ai! , 






Elective. 



Fall Term : 



Winter Term 



Spring Term 



SKNiOk Vl.AH 

American Liteialnre, (Pattee.) 

Geology, (Brigham.) 

Astronomy, (Todd.) 

Geometry— Solid, Books VII. and VIII., (Milne.) 

Geometrical Drawing — twice a week. 

English. 

Chemistry — with Lectures, (Remsen.) 
Psychology, (Halleck.) 
English Literature, (Pancoast.) 
Trigonometry, (Wentworth. ) 
Mechanical Drawing — twice a week. 
English. 

Chemistry, with Lectures, (Remsen.) 
Psychology , ( Halleck . ) 
English Literature, (Pancoast.) 
Biology, (Sedgwick & Wilson.) 
Surveying, (Wentworth.) 
English. 



COURSE IN HISTORY AND LITERATURE. 

This Course is arranged for ladies in answer to an oft-repeated request for special 
instruction in the branches which it includes, and also for those who desire to connect 
these studies with Courses in Mtisic, Art and Expression. Students joining it with a 
Course in Music, Art or Expression will be classified accordingly, and, upon complet- 
ing it, will be awarded a Diploma. 



Fall Term : 



Winter Term : 



Spring Term : 



JUNIOR YEAR. 

r American Literature, (Pattee.) 
' Civil Government, (Young. ) 

German or French. 

English. 

American History, (Montgomery.) 
Greek History, (Myers.) 
Rhetoric, (Genung.) 
German or French. 
English. 

American History, (Montgomery.) 
Rhetoric, (Genung.) 
German or French, 
English. 



40 



FIFTY-FOURTH ANNUAI. CATALOGUE. 



Fali, Term : 



Winter Term 



1 



Spring Term : 



SENIOR YEAR. 

English History, (Iligginson & Chanuiug.) 
French History, (Barnes.) 
German or French. 
English. 

f English Literal uru, U'^iucoast.) 

Psychology, (Hnlleck.) 

German or French. 
[ English. 

Roman History, (Myers.) 
Psychology, (Halleck. ) 
German or French. 
[ English. 



First Year : 



Second Year 



MODERN IvANGUAGES. 

GERMAN. 

Sprach und Lehrbuch, (Spanhoofd.) 
Milrchen, (Anderson and Grimm.) 
Moni der Geissbub, (Spyri.) 
Classic Poems, memorized. 
Dictation and Conversation. 

Sprach und Lehrbuch, (Spanhoofd. ) 

Composition. 

Immensee, (Sturm.) 

Holier als die Kirche, (Von Hillern.) 

Die Jourualisten, (Freitag. ) 

Das Ivied von der Glocke, (Schiller.) 

Classic Poems, studied and memorized. 

Dictation and Conversation. 

FRENCH. 

Chardenal's Complete French Course. 
Contes et Legendes, (Guerber. ) 
Cinq Histoires, (Meras et Sterne.) 
Fontaine's Fables, memorized. 
Dictation and Conversation. 

Chardenal's Complete Course. 

Composition, based on Le Siege de Berlin. 

College Plays. 

Le Prise de la Bastille, (Michclet.) 

ly'Avare, (Moli^re.) 

Fontaine's Fables and Classic Poems, studied and 

memorized. 
Dictation and Conversation. 

French and German entertainments of a varied character are fre- 
quently held. Scenes from plays, declamations and music form a 
part of the evening's entertainment. 

Tuition: 

Fall Term, $6.67; Winter or Spring Term, $5.00. 



I 



First Year : 



Second Year 



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40 



FIFTY-FOURTH ANNUAI. CATALOGUE. 



Faix Term : 



Winter Term 



Spring Term : 



r 



I 



SENIOR YEAR. 

EnKlisli History, (Iligcrinson & Channing. ) 
French History, (Barucs. ) 
German or French. 
English. 

English Literature, (Pancoast.) 
Psychology, (Halleck.) 
German or French. 
Fjiglish. 

Roman History, (Myers.) 
Psychology, (Halleck.) 
German or Ineuch. 
English. 



First Y'ear 



Si'COND Year : 



MODERN LANGUAGES. 

GERMAN. 

Sprach und Lehrbuch, (Spanhoofd.) 
Miirchcn, (Anderson and Grimm.) 
Moni dcr Geissbnb, (Spyri.) 
Classic Poems, memorized. 
Dictation and Conversation. 

Sprach und Lehrbuch, (vSpanhoofd. ) 

Composition. 

Immensee, (Sturm.) 

H()lier als die Kirclie, (Von Hillern.) 

Diejournalisten, (Freitag. ) 

Das Lied von der Glocke, (Schiller.) 

Classic Poems, studied and memorized. 

Dictation and Conversation. 

FRENCH. 

Chardenal's Complete French Course. 
Contes et Legendes, (Guerbcr. ) 
Cinq iHstoires, (Meras et Sterne.) 
Fontaine's Fables, memorized. 
Dictation and Conversation. 

Chardenal's Complete Course. 

Composition, based on Lc SiCge de Berlin. 

College Plays. 

Le Prise dc la Bastille, (Michclet.) 

L'Avare, (MoliOre.) 

F'ontaine's Fables and Classic Poems, studied and 

memorized. 
Dictation and Conversation. 

French and G('rnian entertainments of a varied character are fre- 
(luciitly held. Scenes from j)lays, declamations and nmsic form a 
part of the evening's entertainment. 

Tuition: 

Fall Term, $6.67; Winter or Spring Term, $5.00. 



F I R.ST Yi ar ; 



Second Year : 



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WILUAMSPORT DICKINSON SEMINARY. 



41 



COURSES IN READING. 

A knowledge of Literature is a requisite of general culture, yet ob- 
servation has shown that no branch of education is more neglected. 
The majuiily ui stud* sits devote little time to a course of collateral 
reading, and consequenliy leave school without a well-defined taste 
for literature. To promote a correct use of the ivn^lis?! hnigunge, 
to eiilnco the vorabulnrv, to develop a love for booky, and 10 serve 
as an introduction to the English Classics, i^ tho purpose of this 
Course. 

To present a graded scheme in the study of literature is impos- 
sible, but the aim of this plan, which extends through four years, is, 
first, to gain the attention of the student by a pleasing narrative and 
then gradually to advance him to more solid subjects. 

Two works are read each term, except in the Academic and Soph- 
omore years, and an examination is given on each work, one at the 
middle and the other at the end of the term. The examination cov- 
ers the general points of plot, style, idiom and vocabulary. 



WiNTKR T-rRM : 

Si R NG Term : 



Fall Term : 
Winter Term : 
Spring Term : 



ACADEMICS AND SPECIALS. 

Uncle Tom's Cabin. — Stowe, 

Snow Bound. — Whittier. 

Selections from the Sketch ^oo)s..— Irving. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. 

Pilgrim's Progress. — Bimyan. 

Rime of the Ancient Mariner. — Coleridge. 

Vicar of Wakefield. — Goldsmith. 



Fall Term : 
Winter Term 
Spring Term : 



Fall Term : 
Winter Term 



Spring Term 



{ 
{ 

{ 



JUNIOR YEAR. 

I. Ivanhoe. — Scott. 

II. The Princess. — Tennyson. 

I. Essay on Burns. — Carlyle. 

II. Shorter Voems.— Milton. 

I. Merchant of Venice. — Shakespeare. 

II. Sir Roger de Coverley Papers. — Addison. 

SENIOR YEAR. 

I. Julius Caesar. — Shakespeare. 

II. Silas Marner. — George Eliot. 

I. Speech on Conciliation with America. — Burke. 

II. Vision of Sir henxnfal.—LowelL 

I. Macbeth. — Shakespeare. 

II. Essay on Milton and Addison. — Macauley, 



Students in the College Preparatory Course will be examined in 
the works required for entrance by the New England College Asso- 
ciation, which are as follows; 



42 



FIFTY- FOURTH ANNUAL CATALOGUE. 



WILLIAMSPORT DICKINSON SEMINARY. 



43 



For 1903: The Sir Roger de Coverley Papers; Essay on Burns; The 

Ancient Mariner; Silas Marner; Vicar of Wakefield; 

Vision of Sir Launfal; Ivanhoe; Merchant of Venice; 
Julius Caesar; The Princess. 

For 1904: Merchant of Venice; Julius Caesar; Sir Kugui du (^ov- 
erley Papers; The Princess; Vision of Sir Launlai. 
Ivanhoe; The Ancient Marinor- Vicar of AVakofiold; 
Silas Marner; Essay on Ttunis. 

Any student preparing for any particular College will be exciiiuued 
in the work prescribed by that College, upon application. The total 
cost of all books in these Courses does not exceed fifty cents per 
term. 



DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC. 
Miss BI.LKN Sophia Ransom, Mus. B., Director. 

The aim in this department will be to give thorough instruction, 
both in the technique and the aesthetics of the art; and to this end 
only standard text-books and studies will be used. Students com- 
pleting the Course will receive a Diploma. 

THEORETICAL. 

A thorough course in Harmony and History of Music is obligatory, 
in both of which a satisfactory examination must be passed before 
graduation. 

An opportunity for practice in singing, sight-reading and cultiva- 
tion of musical taste, is given in the Chorus Class, which meets 
twice a week. This year they have studied Curfew Bell by Lynes; 
The Wreck of the Hesperus, by Anderton; Don Munio, by Dudley 
Buck. 

Students may enter the Courses in Instrumental or Vocal Music at 
any point for which they are prepared, and are advanced according 
to their ability and proficiency, not according to the number of terms 
taken. 

Students not wishing to take the Graduating Piano Course may 
take a Course on the Reed Organ, selected by the teacher, and will 
be granted a Diploma, if they acquire ability in reading ordinary 
church music at sight, and in a manner suflficiently clear for purposes 
of accompaniment. 

A full Course of Violin Playing has also been prepared for the 
benefit of those who are seeking superior attainments in this depart- 
ment. 

Pupils have Vocal Culture free of charge, in classes. Attendance 
gt Lectwreg oji Composers required. 



Weekly Musicals are held in Bradley Hall, in which all music stu- 
dents take part. They are not intended as concerts for the public, 
but to give an opportunity to become accustomed to an audience. 
Lectures on the lives of musicians and talks on current events in 

the musical worM nrr givn by the Director. Students have also op- 
portunity i(. i»lay at the Friday rhetorical exercises hold dnrinpr the 
t I. if If \. u?. i! the society anniversaries and liuhn' Commencement 
week. 

ENSKMliLH INLAYING. 

To enable players to acquire proficiency in time and rhythm, con- 
siderable attention is devoted to work on two pianos (four hands 
and eight hands). 

PUBLIC PLAYING. 

Every graduate in Music is required to give a recital in the senior 
year. The program includes ensemble work, with examples of the 
classic, romantic and modern schools. 

FACULTY CONCERTS. 
The music Faculty give public recitals three times a year. 

\T?TIST CONCERTS. 

Lectures and recitals by the leading artists in the country are 
given both in the city and at the Seminary, which all music pupils 
have opportunity to attend. 



COURSE IN PIANO. 

PREPARATORY WORK. 

Clementi, op. 66; Czerny, op. 139; Krause, op. 4; Reinecke, op. 136; 
Bernes, op. 81; Gurlitt, op. 76; Heller, op. 22; Kuhlau, op. 20; Bach, 
"Little Preludes and Fugues;" with pieces of corresponding difl[iculty. 

FIRST YEAR. 

Hummel, op. 49; Moscheles, op. 66; Bertini; Schumann, op. 68, 
book 3; Berens, op. 89, (for left hand); Heller, op. 47; Bach, "Well 
Tempered Clavichord;*' Czerny, op. 170; Haydn, "Sonaten Studien," 
book 5. 

SECOND YEAR. 

Mozart, Sonaten Studien; Cramer, Etudes; Jensen, Etudes; Klein- 
michel, op. 50; Bach, "Well Tempered Clavichord;" Beethoven, So- 
naten; Kullak, op. 48; Erlich, Etudes; octave studies. 

THIRD YEAR. 

Clementi; Liszt, 2 Concert Etuden; Thalberg, op. 26; Bach, In- 
ventions; Chopin, Etudes; Henselt, Etudes; Rubinstein; PoUerl, 
Etudes; Poldinl, Etudes; MacDowell, Etudes. 



44 



FIFTY-FOURTH ANNUAI. CATALOGUE. 



TUITION IN INSTRUMENTAL MUSIC. 

PIANO OR RBED ORGAN. 

Fall (long) Term, 30 Lessons $22 50 

Winter or Spring Term, 24 Lessons 18 00 

Single Lesson, or less than half term, each 1 00 

PIANO OR RKED ORGAN FOR BKGINNKRS. 

Fall Term, 30 Lessons $1^ 75 

Winter or Spring Term, 24 Lessons 15 00 

Single Lesson, or less than half term, each 75 

USE OF PIANO OR REED ORGAN TWO PERIODS KACH DAY. 

Fall Term $ 5 00 

Winter and Spring Terms, each 3 75 

Additional periods at same rate. 

Pipe Organ, each Lesson 1 00 

Use of Organ, ten cents per hour. 

Violin, Fall (long) Term, 30 Lessons 22 50 

Winter or Spring Term, 24 Lessons 1^ 00 

Flute, Guitar, Banjo or Mandolin, Fall (long) Term, 30 Les- 
sons 15 00 

Winter or Spring Term, 24 Lessons 12 00 

Theory of Music, Fall (long) Term, 30 Lessons 22 50 

Winter or Spring Term, 24 Lessons 18 00 

In case of sickness or unavoidable absence, lessons will be made 
up, if the teacher is notified beforehand. 



COURSE IN VOCAL MUSIC. 

Miss Anna Netta Gibson, Director. 

FIRST YEAR. 

Placing the Tone; Breathing Exercises; Study of all the Intervals 
of the Scale with the Vowels; Concone's Pfty Lessons; Concone's 
Thirty Lessons; Sight Reading; Fillmore's First Lessons in Musical 
History. 

SECOND YEAR. 

Concone's Twenty -five Lessons; Sieber's Vocalizes, op. 131; Slow 
Trills and Simple Musical Figures; Concone's Fifteen Lessons; Vao- 
cai Exercises in Italian; Some Songs; Sight Reading; Music in 
America, by Ritter. 

. THIRD YEAR. 

Garcia's Studies; Songs by the Best American and European Com- 
posers, including Mendelssohn and Schubert; Sight Reading and 
Lives of the Composers. 



WILI.IAMSPORT DICKINSON SEMINARY. 



45 



FOURTH YEAR. 

Vocalizes by Bordogni; Songs by Schumann, Franz and Rubin- 
stein; Scenas and Arias from Standard Operas and Oratorios; Sight 
Reading; Purity in Music, Thebaut. 

This year the following Cantatas have been studied and given in 
public by the Chorus Class: The Curfew Bell, by Lynes; The Wreck 
of the Hesperus, by Anderton; Don Alunio, by Dudley Buck. 

TUITION IN VOCAL MUSIC. 

Vocal Culture, Fall {Ujh^j Term, 30 Lessons $22 50 

Vocal Culture, Winter or Spring Term, 24 Lessons 18 00 



Vocal Culture in Class 

Classes in Sight Reading, per month, each 
Chorus Class, adults, Fall (long) Term... 



Chorus Class, adults. Winter or Spring Term 
Chorus Class, children, per Term, each 



Free 

1 00 
3 00 

2 50 
1 50 



SPECIMEN PROGRAM BY MEMBER OF SENIOR CI.ASS. 

Quartette, Scherzetto Mozkowski 

Kamennoi Ostrow Rubinstein 

Minuet Edgar Sherwood 

Voglein Grieg 

Friihlingshauschen Sinding 

If I were a Bird Henselt 

Melodie Paderewskl 

Hungarian Dance Brahms 



COURSE IN ART. 

Mrs. Juwa Lawrence Gassaway. 

This department is under the direction of a lady of rare ability and 
wide culture. Having added to the usual Art Curriculum of a Semi- 
nary the regular course at a School of Design, she is thoroughly 
qualified to meet the most rigid demand for instruction in both the 
useful and ornamental branches of the department. 

The Course in Drawing comprisea Linear, Perspective, Object and 
Model Drawing. Due attention is given to the Branches of Pastel, 
Crayoning and China Decorating — Portrait Crayoning being a spe- 
cialty. The Course in Oil embraces Landscape and Portrait Paint- 
ing. 

Students desiring a full course in this department will, upon satis- 
factory advancement in all its branches, be entitled to a Diploma. 

TUITION. 

Painting in Water Colors, Fall (long) Term, 30 Lessons $15 00 

Painting in Oil, Fall (long) Term, 30 Lessons 15 00 

Portrait Painting, Fall (long) Term, 30 Lessons 25 00 



46 



FIFTY-FOURTH ANNUAI. CATALOGUE. 



Portrait Crayoning, Fall (long) Term, 30 Lessons 15 00 

Photograph Painting, Pall (long) Term, 30 Lessons 15 00 

China Decorating, Fall (long) Term, 30 Lessons 15 00 

Crayon Drawing, Fall (long) Term, 30 Lessons 9 84 

Pencil Drawing, Fall (long) Term, 30 Lessons 8 00 

Mechanical Drawing, Fall (long) Term, 30 Lessons, single 

Pupils 15 00 

Free-hand or Mechanical Drawing, in classes of tluee or more \ no 

Winter or Spring Term one-ritt!i less than Fall Tei m 

Single Lessons, or less than half of a Term, each 75 

In case of sickness or unavoidable absence, lessons missed will be 
made up, if the teacher is notified beforehand. 



EXPRESSION. 
Miss Augusta Helen Gilmore, M. K. h. 

Expression is recognized as a most important branch of education. 
This department is under the supervision of a thoroughly qualified 
and experienced teacher, and will include a careful vocal drill, and 
practice in the entire range of expression. 

It is taught as an art, resting upon recognized laws of nature, 
which are so explained and illustrated as to give a thorough under- 
standing of all the principles upon which this art Is based. 

The orator is educated, not by fashioning him after certain 
model, but by quickening and developing all the intellectual facul- 
ties, cultivating the imagination, disciplining all the agents of ex- 
pression, and then leaving him free to express his thoughts and 
emotions in accordance with his own temperament. 

Fvery graduate in Expression is required to give a public recital. 

FIRST YEAR. 

Physical Culture. ^ 

Voice Culture. 

Articulation, Inflection. 

Elementary Gesture. 

Evolution of Expression, Volume I. 

Animation and Smoothness in Rendering. 

Declamation. 

Physical Culture. 

Voice Culture. 

Quality of Tone, Pitch, Force, Volume. 

Gesture. 

Evolution of Expression, Volume II. 

Personality in Rendering. 

Recitation and Declamation. 



FAI.L Term : 



Winter Term 



WII.LIAMSPORT DICKINSON SEMINARY. 



47 



SiKLNG Term 



Fai.1. Term : 



Spring Term : 



Fai.1, Term : 



Winter Term 



Spring Term 



Winter Term : ^ 



Physical Culture. 
Voice Culture. 

Eradication of Faults in Voice. 
Gesture. 

Evolution of Ex} I (Slot! V^olume III. 
Relation of Values aud Taste. 
Literary Analysis. 
Sturl\- of I'aniuus CiiatioiiS. 
[ Dcebtiiiatioii. 

SECOND \"r:Ai^ 

Hygienic Value of the Physical Culture Exercises. 

Voice Culture. 

Development of Resonance and Flexibility. 

Gesture. 

Evolution of Expression, Volume IV. 

Suggestiveness in Rendering. 

Declamation. 

Hygienic Value of the Physical Culture I xercises. 
Voice Culture. 

Relation of the Voice to Imagination and Emotion. 
Perfedlive Laws of Art, Volume I. 
Self-Command and Progressiveness in Rendering. 
Analysis of Shakespeare. 

Hygenic Value of the Physical Culture Exercises. 

Voice Culture. 

Gesture. 

Perfedlive Laws of Art, Volume II. 

Positiveness and Persuasiveness in Rendering. 

Dramatic Personation. 

Scenes from Shakespeare. 

THIRD YEAR. 

Aesthetic Value of the Physical Culture Exercises. 

Voice Culture. 

Relation of Pitch to Resonance. 

Ledlures on Gesture. 

Perfedlive Laws of Art, Volume III. 

Declamation. 

Study of Shakespeare. 

Aesthetic Value of the Physical Culture Exercises. 
Voice Culture. 

Misuses of Voice, Causes and Cure. 
Adaptation of Selections for Public Reading. 
Translation of Gesture at Sight. 
Perfe(5live Laws of Art, Volume IV. 
Recitation. 

Normal Work in Physical Culture. 
Normal Work in Voice Culture. 

Application of the Steps in the Evolution of Ex- 
pression to Dramatic Forms. 
Normal Work in the Evolution of Expression. 
Interpretative Study of '* The Merchant of Venice," 

•♦ Hamlet " and " Macbeth." 
Literary Analysis. 
I Bible and Hymn Reading, 



■{ ., 



48 



FIFTY-FOURTH ANNUAI^ CATALOGUE. 



Course of work in the Gymnasium: Emerson System of Physical 
Culture; Body Building Exercises; Apparatus Work. 

Students are examined physically when admitted to the Gymna- 
sium, and then systematically prepared, by a series of exercises, for 
intelligent use of the apparRtiis. 

TUITION IN KXPKlvSSlON. 
Private Lessons: 

Fall Term, 30 Lessons $15 OO 

Winter or Spring Term, 24 Lessons 12 00 

Lessons in Classes (of four or more): 

— Fall Term, 30 Lessons 5 oO 

Winter or Spring Term, 24 Lessons 4 00 

PHYSICAL CULTURE. 
Private Lessons: 

Fall Term, 30 Lessons $15 oO 

Winter or Spring Term, 24 Lessons 12 00 

Evening Classes (of twelve or more) : 

Term, Twelve Lessons 2 50 



BUSINESS DEPARTMENT. 

This Course is designed to give a thorough knowledge of the prin- 
ciples of business transactions. It may be pursued alone or in con- 
nection with other studies, thus accommodating those seeking a 
literary as well as those seeking only a business education. The 
time required to finish it will depend upon the proficiency of the pu- 
pil in the English branches, and the diligence with which he works. 

STUDIES. 

The Course will include instruction in the Common English 
branches. Bookkeeping, Single and Double Entry; Stenography; 
Typewriting, Business Correspondence, Business Papers of various 
forms. Civil Government and Political Economy. 

TUITION. 

Students may enter the regular classes without additional cost for 
tuition, except for Bookkeeping, for which $5.00 per term of three 
months will be charged. 

Board, Room, Washing, etc., same as in other departments. 

ADVANTAGES. 

This department offers all the opportunities for general culture 
afforded Students in other departments, assured by well-conducted 
literary societies, lectures, libraries, association with experienced 
teachers, and the refining influences of a Christian home. 




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WILIvlAMSPORT DICKINSON SEMINARY. 



49 



ADMISSION. 

Students may enter this department at any time in the Academic 
year; a fair knowledge of the English branches being the only re- 
quisite. 



V 



The instruction in the Primary Department is based on the induc- 
tive and objective methods, classes having objects presented which 
are studied analytically. A series of Supplementary Readers, which 
include writings of the best literary and historical authors, has 
been introduced. The language lessons embrace Memory Lessons, 
Dictation Exercises, Stories read for Reproduction, Exercises in 
Letter Writing, Word Pictures and Composition Writing. Especial 
attention is given to Arithmetic and the analysis of problems. His- 
tory and Geography are taught with the aid of maps, books of ref- 
erence and the best text-books. Information Lessons or elementary 
science studies in Natural Hitory, teach the classes to observe and 
to make careful note of the objects of the animal, plant and mineral 
kingdoms. The methods of study consist chiefly in examination of 
leaves, rocks and insects. 

Instruction in Expression and Physical Culture is given by the 
teacher of these branches. The teacher of Vocal Music has organized 
a chorus class for the pupils in this department. 

In Elementary Arithmetic, Grammar and Geography the catechet- 
ical method is largely employed, but in Higher English the same 
course is adopted which prevails in the more advanced branches of 
study. The pupil is taught to study the text-book by topics rather 
than by sentences or paragraphs, and encouraged in the lecture 
rodm to give the substance of what he has learned, in his own lan- 
guage. In this manner, while he is adding to his store of knowl- 
edge, he is enlarging his vocabulary, and while he is evolving prin- 
ciples and acquiring facts, he is increasing his power of expression, 
and thus unconsciously, it may be, but nevertheless surely, he lays 
the foundation of an easy and concise style of composition. 

In English and American Literature, the origin of the English lan- 
guage and the growth of the literature are carefully traced. In this 
work the most interesting facts in the lives of the best authors and 
their principal productions are brought under review. 

Instruction in Psychology covers the second and the third terms 
of the Senior year. It embodies definitions of the mental faculties, 
and careful analysis of intellectual processes, with a brief history of 
the science, the main purpose being to stimulate the Student to 
think and investigate for himself. 



50 



FIFTY-FOURTH ANNUAL CATALOGUE. 



I 



WILLIAMSPORT DICKINSON SEMINARY. 



51 



Ethics and T^ogic are taught in the Senior year. Text-books are 
used and daily recitations are required. Class inquiries and dis- 
cussions are encouraged, and familiar lectures are given from time 
to time by the teacher. 

NATURAL SCIENCE. 
In the department of Natural Science the underlying aim is to 
teach the Student to think and observe for himself, and at the same 
time to give him such a fund of practical knowledge as will fit him 
for the active duties of life. In all the branches the text-book is 
used as a means to gain a knowledge of topics rather than to be 
studied as an end in itself, and as far as possible the Student is led 
to the study of the objects themselves. No pains are spared to cul- 
tivate habits of clear, accurate and systematic thought and expres- 
sion. 

Geology is taken during the first term of the Senior year. A prac- 
tical knowledge of the common rocks and minerals is acquired, and 
excursions are made to quarries and regions which illustrate vari- 
ous geological formations. Each Student makes a written report and 
collects characteristic specimens and fossils, representing the seven 
different geological formations, admirably presented to view by out- 
crops within a few miles of the Seminary. 

An Elementary Course in Biology is pursued in the Spring Term 
of the Senior year, in which thorough preparation is made for tech- 
nical advanced work. The simpler laws of life are taken up and 
practical study is made of the fern, earthworm and frog. The oyster, 
crab and cat are also dissected and the general relation in structure 
and physiology of plants and animals is carefully brought out. 

Physics embraces two terms of the Junior year. Mechanics, 
Sound and Heat are taken in the Pall Term; and Optics, Electricity 
and Magnetism in the Winter. The principles and laws are illus- 
trated as far as practicable by apparatus. The relation between the 
different branches is held strongly before the mind, and practical 
questions, draAvn from everyday life, are constantly brought forward 
to teach the Student to apply the principles learned in the text-book. 
The subject of Electricity is presented by a series of experiments 
and lectures, on which full notes are made by each Student. 

In Botany, the laboratory method is followed. Compound micro- 
scopes are accessible to the class, and pupils are provided with 
a powerful lens and apparatus for plant dissection. The work is 
taken up in the following order: Organs of Plants, growth from 
seeds, root, stem, leaf, flowers and fruit; Natural Groups of Plants, 
with especial studies of Algae, Fungi, Muscineae, Filcineae, etc.;* 
Gymnosperms, Monocotyledons, Dicotyledons, with studies of special 
types under each heading. 

The study of the plants themselves, their physiology and anatomy, 
IS made the important thing rather than plant analysis. Lectures 



on the various plant relations are frequently given. A valuable col- 
lection of Botanical specimens from Russelville, Ky., has been pre- 
sented by Miss Myrtle Gray. ^ 

Chemistry occupies the second and third terms of the Senior year. 
During the Spring Term there is also elective work in Analytical 
Chemistry. The chemical laboratory has been fitted up and ijSkfully 
equipped with apparatus and chemicals for advanced technicai work. 
The room is furnished with individual tables, each supplied^ with 
gas, Bunsen's burner, ring stand, water, case with full set of Re- 
agents, and all necessary apparatus for illustrative experiment and 
qualitative analysis. There is also a complete set of apparatus for 
volumetric and gravimetric analysis and assaying. Each Student 
keeping full notes on the experiments which are performed individ- 
ually, becomes thoroughly familiar with chemicals and manipula- 
tions. 

A dark-room has been built and furnished with a complete pho- 
tographic outfit, and Photography is taught during the Spring Term. 

Lectures on subjects of interest to the department are given from 
time to time, illustrated by stereopticon views projected by a new 
oxy-hydro'gen light. 

ANCIENT LANGUAGES. 

In the departments of Greek and Latin, scrupulous attention is 
given to the grammatical structure of these languages, their rela- 
tion to English, the illustration and application of principles, ac- 
curate translation, and to the literary significance of each author 
studied. Mythology and Classical Geography are studied in the 
Senior year. It is aimed to give the Classics by these means their 
proper place as an aid to expression, to a thorough knowledge of our 
own language and to the pursuit of other languages, as well as to 
afford the usual mental discipline. Careful attention is also given 
to those preparing for College or professional study. 

MODERN LANGUAGES. 

The Courses in French and German are designed to give the Stu- 
dents a thorough knowledge of grammar, ability to read at sight, 
and an appreciation of standard literature, both classical and modern. 
The lives of authors are studied in connection with their work. 
Instruction is given, as far as can be made practicable, in the lan- 
guage taught, and conversation is gradually introduced in all classes. 
Especial attention is paid to pronunciation and to written work. 
Dictation and committing poetry to memory, form a part of the 
regular work. 

Informal French and German receptions, where only the language 
taught is used, are held from time to time. Dialogues, declama- 
tions and songs form a part of the evening's entertainment. 



52 



FIFTY-FOURTH ANNUAL CATALOGUE. 



WILLIAMSPORT DICKINSON SEMINARY. 



53 



MATHEMATICS. 

The Course in Mathematics is co-extensive with that in the ma- 
jority of our best Colleges. Although the study is considered as 
chiefly disciplinary, the aim throughout the Course is to acquaint 
the Student with the instruments in most familiar use by the practi- 
cal scientists and mathematicians of the day, as well as to strengthen 
his mental faculties and increase his logical acumen. A\ Hie com- 
mencement of each subject a familiar lecture is given on its history, 
and practical utility. 

A study of the courses pursued will indicate the extent of the 
work done. 

HISTORY AND RHETORIC. 

In the study of History the object is to familiarize the Student 
with the main facts and principles, thus forming a foundation on 
which to build by future reading and investigation. To this end 
the text-book is thoroughly studied in connection with a Manual of 
Classical Antiquities and an Atlas, while at the same time the Stu- 
dent is encouraged to consult other authorities and bring in addi- 
tional matter bearing on the subject. Recitations is by the analytical 
and topical methods. 

Special attention is given to instruction in Rhetoric, on account 
of its great value to the Student. The principles of good writing 
are studied and analyzed with a view to their practical application. 

During the last term much of the time is devoted to original pro- 
ductions in the various departments of literary composition, on 
themes assigned by the teacher. These productions are read before 
the class, where general criticisms are offered, after which they are 
handed to the teacher for more careful correction. 



NEW SCHOLARSHIPS' 



Lehigh University has kindly placed at the disposal of the 
President of this institution a free scholarship in the Classical 
or Latin-Scientific Course, which is available by any member 
of the Senior Class, covering the years 1 902-1904. 

Dickinson College oifers for competition to any member of 
the Senior Class in this institution a free scholarship covering 
tuition for the period of four years. 



1 xvxxi-iiZiO* 



The following prizes will be awarded during this year : 

The President's Prize— The gift of the President to the 
champion Basket Ball Team. 

The F. G. Smith Prize— The gift of Freeborn Garrettson 
Smith, of Brooklyn, N. Y., to that student who shall be 
awarded the first prize in Piano Music. 

The HE11.NER Prize— The gift of Rev. S. A. Heilner, D. D., 
of Philadelphia, to that member of the class in Psychology 
who shall be awarded the prize in Psychology. 

The FACUI.TY Prize— The gift of the Faculty to that mem- 
ber of the Rhetoric Class who shall excel in writing and read- 
ing an essay. 

The Dr. John C. Thompson Prize— The gift of Dr. John 
C. Thompson, of Buffalo, to that young woman who shall be 
awarded the first prize in Expression. 

The Sylvester Mussina Prize— The gift of Sylvester 
Mussina, of Williamsport, to that young woman who shall be 
awarded the second prize in Expression. 

The Mrs. Jennie Jones Andrews Prize— The gift of 
Mrs. Jennie Jones Andrews, of Philipsburg, to that young 
man who shall be awarded the first prize in Expression. 

The C. C. Mussina Prize— The gift of Charles C. Mussina, 
of Williamsport, to that young man who shall be awarded the 
second prize in Expression. 

The Miss Norcross Prize— The gift of Miss Mae Ruth 
Norcross, of Philadelphia, to that student who shall excel in 
an original essay. 



54 



FIFTY-FOURTH ANNUAL CATALOGUE. 



"^RIZHS AWARDED IN 190L 



THE FREEBORN G. SMITH PRIZE. 

The First Prize for Excellence in Instrumental Music. 

Mabel Florence Gohl Williamsport 

THE PRESIDENT'S PRIZE. 

For Excellence in Writing and Delivering an Oration. 
Joshua Samuel Cudlip AUentown 

THE FACULTY PRIZE. 

The gift of the Faculty to that member of the Rhetoric Class who shall 

excel in Writing and Reading an Essay. 

Harry William Farrington Baltimore, Md. 

THE MRS. JENNIE RUSSELI. REED PRIZE. 

The First Prize to young women for Excellence in Expression. 
Florence Hannah Rutherford Laurelton 

THE DR. C. C. WALKER PRIZE. 

The Second Prize to young women for Excellence in Expression. 
Julia Elizabeth Rue Curwensville 

THE BUSH & BULI. CO. PRIZE. 

The First Prize to young men for Excellence in Expression. 

Wilbur Harrington Norcross Muhlenburg 

THE MISS GILMORE PRIZE. 

The Second Prize to young men for Excellence in Expression. 
Edmund Burke Keeley Tyrone 



WILLIAMSPORT DICKINSON SEMINARY. 



55 



HONORS AWARDED IN l^OL 



FIRST CI ASSTCAL— VATKDTCTORY. 
Mary Creighton Ames Williamsport 

FIRST SCIENTIFIC— SALUTATORY. 
Eli Edward Sponsler Everett 

SECOND SCIENTIFIC— SCIENTIFIC ORATION. 
John Frederick Mahoney DuBoistown 

BELIvES LETTRES— BELLES LETTRES ESSAY. 
Mary Elizabeth Mack Girardville 



SCHOi./ \ I . S 1 1 IPS A W Ai<u£D IN 1 90 1 • 

THE BALTIMORE WOMAN'S COLLEGE SCHOLARSHIP. 
Mary Creighton Ames Williamsport 

THE EDWARD J. GRAY SCHOLARSHIP. 

First— Mary Creighton Ames Williamsport 

Second — Eli Edward Sponsler Everett 

THE ALEXANDER E. PATTON SCHOLARSHIP. 

First — Wilbur Harrington Norcross Muhlenburg 

Second — Andrew J. English Mills 

THE ELIZABETH S. JACKSON SCHOLARSHIP. 
George Albert Duvall Akersville 

THE WILUAM L. WOODCOCK SCHOLARSHIP. 
Maude May Everett New York, N. Y. 



56 



FIF'TY-I^OURTH ANNUAL CATAI.OGUE. 



ATHLETIC T?Fri )RU_jQ 



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Adequate but not excessive attention lias I.k n given to itli 
letics during the season of 1901-1902. i In u suits have l)ee!i 
exceedingly gratifying to the •^tiidi iit hociy and their tiiends, 
awaking a keener interest and a largci eiiLliUbiabm in iield 
sports, while at the same time the Seminary has been advanced 
to the front rank in Inter-Scholastic Sports. Out of eight 
games of football played last fall the team won seven, scoring 
151 points against 31 by its opponents. Appended is the 
schedule : 



September 28, at Williamsport- 
October 9, at Williamsport — 
October 12, at New Berlin — 
October 19, at Laurelton — 
October 26, at Mansfield — 
November 2, at Williamsport- 
November 9, at Bellefonte — 
November 23, at Williamsport- 



-Seminary 
Seminary 
Seminary 
Seminary 
Seminary 
-Seminary 
Seminary 
-Seminary 



. i7=Ivaurelton A. A . . . 
. 26=Bellefonte Academy . 
. 26=Central Pa. College . 
. I i=Ivaurelton A. A . . . 
. a— Mansfield S. N. S . . 
. 5o=Central Pa. College . 
. iS^^Bellefonte Academy . 
. 6=Mansfield S. N. S . . 



Total scores 151 



o 
o 
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o 

21 
O 

5 
5 

At the eighth annual relay races, held April 26, 1902, in 
Philadelphia, University of Pennsylvania, the Seminary Relay 
Team took first place in its race with West Chester, Geneseo, 
Philadelphia Normal Schools and South Jersey Institute, cov- 
ering the mile in three minutes and forty-five seconds. The 
banner won on this occasion hangs in the trophy room of the 
Seminary. 

May 3 the Seminary Track Team, at the first inter-scholastic 
meet, held at Carlisle, Dickinson College, captured three first, 
one second and three third places in a field of eighty con- 
testants. 

A dual track meet with Susquehanna University, held May 
30th on the Seminary field, resulted in the scoring of 70 points 
by the Seminary Track Team against 34 points of the com- 
petitors. The Track Team made first and second place in all 
but one event of that day. The banner won at this contest 
adorns the trophy room. 



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WILUAMSPORT DICKINSON SEMINARY. 



57 



RESIDENT GRADUA lES, 



MUSIC. 

I.AUP A EDNA APKER. 

RUTH EI.IvA IvKAMY. 

CLAIRE MAY IvEVI. 

MARY WARTHMAN SEELEY. 

CATHERINE ELIZABETH SHAFFER. 

CORNELIA GRAY WILSON. 



ART. 

FRANCELIA SOPHIA HUNTLEY. 

DAISY MILLS. 

MARY GERTRUDE NEECE. 



ElvOCUTION AND PHYSICAL CULTURE. 

MARY GERTRUDE BURCH. 
ESTELLA MAY FOLLMER. 



MODERN LANGUAGES. 

MRS. EDWARD JAMES GRAY. 
CORNELIA GRAY WILSON. 



CLASSICAL DEPARTMENT, 



WILLIAM SEAGAR MALLALIEU. 



58 



FIFTY-FOURTH ANNUAL CATALOGUE. 



SENIOR Class, 



Bailey, Mary Emma — b. 1 Wiconisco 

Pollmer, Mabel— b. 1 Williamsport 

Jenks, Mabel Irene— s Williamsport 

Mendenhall, Aletheia Peace — b. 1 Berwick 

Penepacker, Nettie Mabel — c Philipsburg 

Pennington, Jennie Belle — s .^^rr v . . . > . r7 .,,.,, . . « . . ,. . . » Bedford 

Ritter, Florence Eva— c South Williamsport 

Rue, Julia Elizabeth — c Curwensville 

Shaver, Mary Mumper — c Lock Haven 

Sherlock, Alice Ray — s Altoona 

Stevens, Nellie Belle— b. J Lewistown 

Winder, Bessie Mabel, b. 1 Williamsport 

Barrett, Charles Henry — c. p , Lykens 

Bond, Edward James— s Nesquehoning 

Bowman, George Alfred— s Hollidaysburg 

Cramer, Harry Griffith— s Hollsopple 

English, Andrew J. — c Mills 

Hoey, James Chaplain— c. p Wayne 

Hoffman, William Maguire — s Montgomery 

Holland, Clyde Stuart — c Holliday 

Mallalieu, William' Seagar — c Williamsport 

Norcross, Wilbur Harrington — c Muhlenburg 

Skeath, William Charles — c Mahanoy City 

Strine, Robert Clarence — s Muncy 

Wilkinson, James Salmon — c Burlingame 

c— Classical. s,— Scientific. b. 1.— Belles I^ettres. c. p.— College Preparatory. 

INSTRUMENTAI, MUSIC. 

Follmer, Mabel Williamsport 

Seeley, Mary Warthman. Jersey Shore 

Siers, Ethel May Altoona 

Ubel, Maude Amanda Johnsonburg 

EXPRESSION. 

Norcross, Wilbur Harrington Muhlenburg 



WILI^IAMSPORT DICKINSON SEMINARY. 



59 



JUNIOR ^LA5S, 



Bender, Christine Emily— b. 1 Strasburg 

Blatchford, Edith G.— b. 1 Terry, So. Dak. 

Blatchford, Effie Belle— b. 1 Terry, Su. Dak. 

Decker, Juniata Mabel— b. 1 Orbisonia 

Everett, Maude May— b. 1 New York, N. Y. 

Hill, Josephine— b. 1 Williamsport 

Horn ,Mabel Elvira — b. 1 .7777 . . . Jersey Mills 

Nutt, Abby Louise — c. p Williamsport 

Reading, Anna Belle — b. 1 Williamsport 

Seaman, Anna Louise — b. 1 Nauvoo 

Seeley, Effie Emaline — b. 1 Benton 

Selfe, Serena Webster — b. 1 Darlington, Md. 

Stearns, Rachael Hays — b. 1 Williamsport 

Treaster, Grace Margaret — h. & 1 Milroy 

Weaver, Clara Alberta — h. & I Montoursville 

Yost, Edith May— b. 1 Linden 

Andrews, Frank J. — c Ralston 

Burgan, Harry Wilson — c Baltimore, Md. 

Chilcote, Clyde Silas — c Shrewsbury 

Duvall, George Albert — s Akersville 

Parrington, Harry William — c. p Baltimore, Md. 

Fallenbaum, Edwin — p. s Cedar Lane 

Graham, Willis Aquilla — p. s Woolrich 

Grove, George LaRue . . p. s Williamsport 

King, Millard Barholomew — s Williamsport 

Knox, Robert James — c Williamsport 

McClintock, James — c. p Philadelphia 

Williamson, Clarence Hiess — p. s Bellwood 

c- Classical. s.— Scientific. b. 1.— Belles I^ettres. c. p.— College Preparatory, 
p. s.— Practical Science, h. & 1.— History and I^iterature. 



SOPT TOMORE CLASS. 



Dunsmore, Catherine Edessa — b. 1 Carrolltown 

Hughes, Elizabeth Denison — c. p Williamsport 

Lepley, Eva Alberta — s Schellsburg 

Metzger, Hannah Margaret — b. 1 Williamsport 

Miller, Florence Estella — b. 1 Williamsport 

Norcross, Eva Clydessa — c. p Philadelphia 

Rich, Katherine Luella — b. 1 Woolrich 



6o 



FIFTY- FOURTH ANNUAL CATALOGUE. 



WILLIAMSPORT DICKINSON SEMINARY. 



6l 



Stearns, Catherine— b. 1 „r„- 

Truman, Jessie-b. 1.... Wilhamsport 

West, Louise Angeia-c. p:::::::::::: .\\v.::: i;:! :::;wineSer "vT 

Bower, Harry Clayton-s • • • • wmcnester, Va. 

Cox. Banks Albert-c. . Bnrl„,f. ,,ne 

Guldin, Jessie Evans-e • • .Dimmsville 

Manalieu, Charles Thomas Asbu;y-pVs\\\\\\\\\\\\V."wimI'pon 
Hotter, George-c. p ' " ^U imsport 

Potter. John Wesley-s. . Fredenek, Md. 

Rutherford, John Llncoln-s.7. -Newport 

Skllllngton, John Walter-s. ^-Laurelton 

Smith, John Milton-c. p . •••••• Breezewood 

Straub, John Anthony-p. s . ;;. • " ' " ■^^^'°''- ^^: 

Swartz, Benton Shelly-c. p. . Wilhamsport 

Swope. Charles Wesley-s... . ^. .. ..AUentown 

Willard, Willis Wardner-c. t^ "''l 

Woodward, Charles Vanderbilt -sV.V.V.V.V.;.\\;\V.;;::.\H"war'd 
c-Classical. s.-Scie„tific. b. l.-Belles I.ettres. c. p.-CoUege' Prepartry. 

p. s.— Practical Science. 



FRESl IMEN. 



Savidge, Hazel Elizabeth.......... wnv„ 

Bond, Arthur Tregear ._^. W Ihamsport 

Drake, Carl VandTver Frostburg, Md. 

Follmer, Clinton Lee w ,^"''^' ^''• 

Johnston, Hugh Dickson Wilhamsport 

Latshaw, Blair Sumner ^"^'^^'t^,!'^ 

McGarvey, Luther Wesley. ... Port Matilda 

Ripple, Thomas Franklin.... Coalport 

Schneider, George Louis ■.'..■;. •^""^ ' " ! ,; .• ^ostello 

Strawinski, William Evans.... ^""^^^ Wilhamsport 

Flemington 



ACADEMIC. 



SECOND YEAR. 

Fell, Kittle May New York N Y 

Frey, Lydia Ann w.m 

Freyer, May G .^.WiUiamsport 

irvin. Jane Patton Baltimore. Md. 

Curwensville 



Longbay, Caroline Ellen Picture Rocks 

Miller, May Lillian Warrensville 

Miller, Pearl Wilhamsport 

Park, Lydia Mae jsTew Mill|.ort 

Ames Thomas WilUamsport 

Bender, Levi Lewid WilUamsport 

Callender, George Winton Surprise, Neb. 

Fisher, Royal Edgar Williaiuiipoi i 

Lyon, Thomas Harold WilUamsport 

Neal, James Altoona 

Neff , Ernest . WiUi^amsnort 

Pierce, Abram Woodland 

Smith, William Handley Cedar Run 

Snyder, Herman Arwood .!..... '..WiUiamsport 

Williams, Jesse Clarke Roaring Spring 

FIRST YEAR. 

Dunkle, Alta E WilUamsport 

Holtzhower, Essie Renovo 

Mosteller, Margaret Ellen Warrensville 

Bubb, James Lewars WilUamsport 

Mariani, Jose M yauco, Porto Rico 

RadcUfCe, George Albert Spangler 

Rhawn, James Scarlet Catawissa 



CLASSICAL DEP/ f. TMLNT. 



Penepacker, Nettie M PhUipsburg 

Ritter, Florence E 505 Market Street, South WilUamsport 

Rue, J. Elizabeth Curwensville 

Savidge, Hazel E 147 East Fourth Street, WilUamsport 

Shaver, Mary M 34 west Main Street, Lock Haven 

Andrus, Frank J j^^,^^^^ 

Bond, Arthur T Frostburg. Md. 

Burgan, Harry W 1816 East Monument Street, Baltimore, Md 

Chilcote, Clyde S Shrewsbury 

Cox, Banks A Dimmsville 

Drake Carl V Frostburg, Md. 

English, Andrew J j,.,,^ 

Follmer, C. Lee WilUamsport 

Guldin Jessie E ^uncy Valley 

Holland, Clyde S HolUday 

Johnston, Hugh D Austin 



62 



FIFTY-FOURTH ANNUAL CATALOGUE. 



WILLIAMSPORT DICKINSON SEMINARY. 



63 



Knox, Robert J 657 Franklin Street, Williamsport 

Latshaw, Blair S Port Matilda 

Mallalieu, William S Williamsport 

McGarvey, Luther W Coalport 

Norcross, Wilbur H Muhlenburg 

Ripple, Thomas F Costello 

Schneider, George L. South Williamsport 

Skeath, William C 1304 East Centre Street, Mahanoy City 

Strawinski, WiUiam E Flemington 

Wilkinson, James S Burlingame 

Willard, Willis W 702 Penn Street, Williamsport 



SCIENTIFIC DEPART VI i N T. 



Jenks, Mabel 1 506 Edwin Street, Williamsport 

Lepley, Eva A Bbnllsbiirg 

Pennington, Jennie B Bedford 

Sherlock, A. Ray 1013 Chestnut Avenue, Altoona 

Bond, Edward J. Nesquehoning 

Bower, Harry C Burlingame 

Bowman, George A Hollidaysburg 

Cramer, Harry G Hollsopple 

Duvall, George A Akersville 

Fellenbaum, Edwin P Cedar Lane 

Hoffman, William M Montgomery 

King, Millard B 931 East Third Street, Williamsport 

Potter, John W Newport 

Rutherford, J. Lincoln Laurelton 

Skillington, J. Walter Breezewood 

Stine, R. Clarence Muncy 

Swope, Charles W Mapleton Depot 

Woodward, Charles V Howard 



Everett, Maude M 199 Washington Street, New York, N. Y. 

Follmer, Mabel Williamsport 

Hill, Josephine 1221 Erie Avenue, Williamsport 

Horn, Mabel E Jersey Mills 

Mendenhall, Alatheia P Berwick 

Metzger, H. Margaret 1006 West Fourth Street, Williamsport 

Miller, Florence E 403 Brandon Avenue, Williamsport 

Reading, A. Belle 705 Fifth Avenue, Williamsport 

Rich, Katherine L Wouli ich 

Seaman, A. Louise Nauvoo 

Seeley, Effie E Benton 

Selfe, Serena W. .vr ; Darlington, Md. 

Stearns, Catharine ....511 West Fourth Street, Williamsport 

Stearns, Rachael H 511 West Fourth Street, Williamsport 

Stevens, Nellie B Lewistown 

Truman, Jessie Trout Run 

Winder, Bessie M 402 Rural Avenue, Williamsport 

Yost, Edith M Linden 



COLLEGE PPEPA R 



)^^V^• 



Hughes, Elizabeth D 719 Campbell Street, Williamsport 

Norcross, Eva C 211 North Thirteenth Street, Philadelphia 

Nutt, A. Louise 632 Pine Street, Williamsport 

West, L. Angela Winchester, Va. 

Barrett, Charles H Lykens 

Farrington, Harry W 708 Reservoir Street, Baltimore, Md 

Hoey, James C Wayne 

McClintock, James 2747 North Fifth Street, Philadelphia 

Motter, George Frederick, Md. 

Smith, J. Milton Ashton, Md. 

Swartz, Benton S 537 Green Street, Allentown 



BELLES LETTRES DEPARTMENT. 



Bailey, Mary E Wiconisco 

Bender, Christine E Strasburg 

Blatchford, Edith G Terry, So. Dak. 

Blatchford, Effie B Terry, So. Dak. 

Decker, Juniata M Orbisonia 

Dunsmore, Catherine E Carrolltown 

r 



PRACTICAL SCIENCE^ 



Graham, Willis A Woolrich 

Grove, George L 435 Grant Street, Williamsport 

Mallalieu, Charles T. A Williamsport 

Straub, John A 333 Washington Street, Williamsport 

Williamson, Clarence H Bellwood 



64 



PIFTY-POURTH ANNUAL CATALOGUE. 



HISTORY AND LITERATURE. 



Treaster, Grace M Milroy 

Weaver, Clara A Montoursville 



ACAULMIC DEPAR I'MEM 



> t-f 



Dunkle, Alta E 1029 Rural Avenue, Williamsport 

Fell, Kittle M 120 West Forty-Fifth Street New York, N. Y. 

Frey, Lydia A 326 Almond Street, Williamsport 

Freyer, May G 1601 North Chester Street, Baltimore, Md. 

Holtzhower, Essie Renovo 

Irvin, Jane P Curwensville 

Longbay, Caroline E Picture Rocks 

Miller M. Lillian Warrensville 

Miller," Pearl Hepburn Street, Williamsport 

Mosteller, Margaret E Warrensville 

Park, L. Mae New Millport 

Ames, Thomas 338 High Street, Williamsport 

Bender, Levi L 80 Washington Street, Williamsport 

Bubb, James L. . . . < 407 West Fourth Street, Williamsport 

Callender, George W Surprise, Neb 

Fisher, R. Edgar 511 Louisa Street, Williamsport 

Lyon, Thomas H 18 West Fourth Street, Williamsport 

Mariani, Jose M Yauco, Porto Rico 

Neal, James 1411 Eleventh Avenue, Altoona 

Neff, Ernest Williamsport 

Pierce, Abram W^oodland 

Radcliffe, George A Spangler 

Rha wn, James S Catawissa 

Smith, William H Cedar Run 

Snyder, Herman A Williamsport 

Williams, Jesse C Roaring Spring 



PRIMARY DEPARTMENT. 



Hubbard, Margaret Ethel 338 Louisa Street, Williamsport 

Hubbard, Sarah Esther 338 Louisa Street, Williamsport 

Hughes, Emily Hancock 719 Campbell Street, Williamsport 

Metzger, Mary Wagner 1006 West Fourth Street, Williamsport 

Nelson, Christine McDonald 715 West Fourth Street, Williamspprr 



3 

m 

(0 

m 

< 

m 





H 

OD 
> 

r 
r 

H 

m 
> 




4 



1 



\ 



WILLIAMSPORT DICKINSON SEMINARY. 



65 



Pyles, Mary Diener 725 Elmira Street, Williamsport 

Reed, Elizabeth Russell 157 Pine Street, Williamsport 

Rhoads, Phoebe Eleanor West Fourth Street, Williamsport 

Slate, Martha Virg-inia 361 Mulberry Street, Williamsport 

Smith, Elizabeth Linn Hazleton 

Stearns, Emilie Lyon 511 West Fourth Street, Williamsport 

Gassaway, Julian Lawrence New York, N. Y. 

Savide^e, Charles Earl 147 East Fourth Street, ^TiHiamsport 

Smith, Frederick Landerburn Hazleton 



MODERN LANGUAGE DEPARTMENT- 



FRENCH. 

Almy, Emily White 507 West Fourth Street, Williamsport 

Campbell, Elizabeth Priestly. .. .44 West Fourth Street, Williamsport 

Foley, Edith 848 West Fourth Street, Williamsport 

Horn, Mabel Elvira Jersey Mills 

Hughes, Elizabeth Denison 719 Campbell Street, Williamsport 

Nutt, Abby Louise 632 Pine Street, Williamsport 

Seaman, Anna Louise Nauvoo 

Selfe, Serena Webster Darlington, Md. 

Singer, Annetta 700 Hepburn Street, Williamsport 

Singer, Rea 700 Hepburn Street, Williamsport 

Treaster, Grace Margaret Milroy 

Yost, Edith May Linden 

Sadler, Isaac Lewis Idaville 

GERMAN. 

Allen, Alice Brown Portland, Mich. 

Blatchford, Edith G Terry, So. Dak. 

Blatchford, Effie Belle Terry, So. Dak. 

Dunsmore, Catherine Edessa Carrolltown 

Everett, Maude May 199 Washington Street, New York, N. Y. 

Gray, Mrs. Edward James Seminary, Williamsport 

Harcourt, Blanche Frances 102 North Fourth Street, Reading 

McKillip, Rebecca Hollidaysburg 

McMurray, Josephine Rex New Washington 

McMurray, Mary Floyd New Washington 

Miller, Florence Estella 403 Brandon Avenue, Williamsport 

Norcross, Eva Cyldessa. . . .211 North Thirteenth Street, Philadelphia 

Palmatier, Mary Mabel Coudersport 

Park, Dessa Marguerite Westover 

Pennington, Jennie Belle Bedford 

Rich, Katherine Luella Woolrich 



66 



FIFTY-FOURTH ANNUAL CATALOGUE. 



Seeley, Effie Emaline Benton 

Sherlock, Alice Ray. 1013 Chestnut Avenue, Altoona 

Shiffler, Helen East Lawn, Williamsport 

Siers, Ethel May 1714 Thirteenth Street, Altoona 

Singer, Annetta 700 Hepburn Street, Williamsport 

Singer, Rea 700 Hepburn Street, Williamsport 

Stewart, Edna East Third Street, Williamsport 

Weaver, Clara Alberta ..Montoursville 

West, Louise Angela Winchester, Va. 

Wilson, Cornelia Gray Newberry 

Allen, William Henry ^Williamstown 

Bond, Edward James . r.Tr.T7:T7~ " ,. *.Nesquehoning 

Bowman, George Alfred Hollidaysburg 

Davis, Andrew Crocket 346 High Street, Williamsport 

Duble, Norman Henry 317 Park Avenue, Williamsport 

Graham, Willis Aquilla Woolrich 

Hoffman, William Maguire Montgomery 

King, Millard Bartholomew 931 East Third Street, Williamsport 

Mallalieu, William Seagar Williamsport 

Rutherford, John Lincoln Laurelton 

Schneider, George Louis South WilHamsport 

Smith, John Milton Ashton, Md. 

Williamson, Clarence Hiess Bellwood 



MUSIC DEPARTMENT. 



INSTRUMENTAL. 

Allen, Alice Brown Portland, Mich. 

Allison, Emma Amelia 956 First Street Williamsport 

Apker, Laura Edna 1420 Erie Avenue, Williamsport 

Bankes, Eva Pearl 127 West Fourth Street, Williamsport 

Beyer, Mary Elizabeth Tyrone 

Blatchford, Edith G Terry, So. Dak. 

Blatchford, Effie Terry, So. Dak. 

Bostley, Alice Mary South Williamsport 

Campbell, Elizabeth Priestley. .44 West Fourth Street, Williamsport 

De Long, Jennie Ruth Medix Run 

Dunsmore, Catherine Edessa Carrolltown 

Fell, Kittle May New York, N. Y. 

Follmer Mabel ...Williamsport 

Gee, Ida Louise Trout Run 

German, Bessie May Williamsport 

Gilliland, Julia Claire Karthaus 

Harcourt, Blanche Frances 102 North Fourth Street, Reading 

Houiser, Viola Muncy 



WII.LIAMSPORT DICKINSON SEMINARY. 



67 



Hill, Grace Ernest Jersey Shore 

Holtzhower, Essie Renovo 

Horn, Mabel Elvira Jersey Mills 

Hubbard, Sarah Esther 338 Louisa Street, Williamsport 

Jenks, Mabel Irene 506 Edwin Street, Williamsport 

Korb, Alda Mary Roaring Springs 

Leamy, Ruth 425 Lycoming Street, Williamsport 

Levi, Claire M 510 East Third Street, WilHamsport 

Levi, Gretchen Mulberry Street, Williamsport 

Longbay, Caroline Ellen Picture Rocks 

McCormick, Myra Kinkade 945 West Fourth Street, Williamsport 

McMurray, Josephine Rex New Washington 

Miller, Anna May Duboistown 

Miller, May Lillian Warrensville 

Mitchell Grace 313 Elm Street, Newberry 

Mundy, Bessie Sarah Bradford 

Nichols, Florence Ida 811 Maple Place, Williamsport 

Norcross, Eva Clydessa 211 North Thirteenth Street Philadelphia 

Nutt, Abby Louise 632 Pine Street, Williamsport 

Palmatier, Mary Mabel Coudersport 

Park, Dessa Marguerite Westover 

Park, Lydia Mae New Millport 

Penepacker, Nettie Mabel Philipsburg 

Rankin, Jennie A Uniontown 

Rice, Helen 541 Market Street, Williamsport 

Schroeder, Martha Wilhelmina 1144 Isabella Street, Williamsport 

Seeley, Mary Warthman Jersey Shore 

Selfe, Serena Webster Darlington, M*d. 

Shaffer, Catharine Elizabeth 623 Washington Street, Williamsport 

Siers, Ethel May 1714 Thirteenth Street, Altoona 

Steck, Anna Elizabeth Hughesville 

Stevens, Edith May 447 Pine Street, Williamsport 

Sturgis, Bessie Edith Millheim 

Thompson, Esther 142 Market Street, Williamsport 

Titus, Edna Louise 834 Fourth Avenue, Williamsport 

Treaster, Grace Margaret Milroy 

Troxell, Blanche 1051 Penn Street, Williamsport 

Truman, Jessie Trout Run 

Libel, Maude Amanda Johnsonburg 

Villinger, Hannah May 1015 Louisa Street, Williamsport 

Walters, Ada Uniontown 

Weaver Clara Alberta Montoursville 

West, Louisa Angela Winchester, Va. 

West, Mary 936 High Street, Williamsport 

Winner, Ruth 1063 East Third Street, Williamsport 

Wood, Olive Winifred White Pine 

Barrett, Charles Henry Lykens 

Chilcote, Clyde Silas Shrewsbury 



68 



FIFTY-FOURTH ANNUAL CATAT.OGUK. 



Mariani, Jose Maria Yauco, Porto Rico 

Rhawn, James Scarlet Catawissa 

Swope, Charles Wesley Mapleton Depot 

VOCAL. 

Allen, Alice Brown Portland, Mich. 

Beyer, Mary Elizabeth Tyrone 

Decker, Juniata Mabel \[ 'orbisonia 

Donaldson, Mary Louise 343 East Third Street, Williamsport 

Pell, Kittie May New York, N. Y. 

^Ganoe, Elsie Jersey Shore 

Gee, Ida Louise T^^^t Run 

Gilbert, Claire Belle 1183 Park Avenue, Williamsport 

Harcourt, Blanche Frances 102 North Fourth Street, Reading 

Holtzhower, Essie Reriovo 

Horn, Mabel Elvira Jersey Mills 

Ker, Charlotte Munroe. 936 Westminster St., N. W.,Washington, D. C. 

Kirk, May Johnson 551 Southern Avenue, South Williamsport 

Korb, Alda Mary Roaring Springs 

McMurray, Mary Floyd New Washington 

Metzger, Hannah Margaret. . 1006 West Fourth Street, Williamsport 

Miller, May Lillian Warrensville 

Mundy, Bessie Sarah Bradford 

Nutt, Abby Louise 632 Pine Street, Williamsport 

Palmatier, Mary Mabel Coudersport 

Park, Lydia Mae ^ew Millport 

Rich, Katherine Luella Woolrich 

Savidge, Hazel Elizabeth 147 East Fourth Street, Williamsport 

Scott, Florence 521 West Third Street, Williamsport 

Seaman, Anna Louise Nauvoo 

Selfe, Serena Webster '.V.V.*Darlington, Md. 

Siers, Ethel May 1714 Thirteenth Street, Altoona 

Shaffer, Elizabeth 623 Washington Street, Williamsport 

Smith. Elizabeth M 1047 Erie Avenue, Williamsport 

Stevens, Edith May, 447 Pine Street, Williamsport 

Stevens, Nellie Belle Lewistown 

Sturgis, Bessie Edith Millheim 

Treaster, Grace Margaret Milroy 

Truman, Jessie *..**..". .Trout Run 

Ubel Maude Johnsonburg 

Walters, Ada Uniontown 

West, Louisa Angela Winchester, Va. 

Wood, Olive Winifred ^hite Pine 

Zuber, Carrie 316 Edwin Street, Williamsport 

Barrett, Charles Henry Lykens 

Bond, Arthur Tregear Frostburg, Md. 

Bowman, George Alfred Hollidaysburg 

Callender, George Winton Surprise, Neb. 



! 



WILLIAMSPORT DICKINSON SEMINARY. 



69 



Cox, Banks Albert Dimmsville 

Drake, Carl Vandiver Frostburg, Md. 

Farrington, Harry William 708 Reservoir Street, Baltimore, Md. 

Fellenbaum, Edwin P Cedar Lane 

German, Frank Kennedy Williamsport 

Graham, Willis Aquilla Woolrich 

Hazelet, John Ransom 635 Hepburn Street, Williamsport 

Johnston, Hugh Dickson Austin 

Latshaw, Blair Sumner Port Matilda 

McGarvey, Luther Wesley Coalport 

Motter, George Frederick, Md. 

Norcross, Wilbur Harrington Muhlenburg 

Skillington, John Walter Breezewood 

Swartz, Benton Shelly 537 Green Street, AUentown 

Swope, Charles Wesley Mapleton Depot 

Woodward, Charles Vanderbilt Howard 



ELOCUTTC 



A N O 



PHYSICAL CULTURE. 



Bell, Ada C 439 Grant Street, Williamsport 

Bender, Christine Emily Strasburg 

Bennett, Mrs. Berton E Earlville N. Y. 

Beyer, Mary Elizabeth Tyrone 

Border, Mrs. Samuel V 470 Hepburn Street, Williamsport 

Bubb, Estella 215 Pine Street, Williamsport 

Bubb, Catharine N 215 Pine Street, Williamsport 

Burch, Mary Gertrude 904 Rural Avenue, Williamsport 

Burkholder, Mrs. Harry Clay Jamestown 

Campbell, Emma C 40 Ross Street, Williamsport 

Clark, Oleive Blanche Blanchard 

Curts, Elizafceth Gamble .Jersey Shore 

Dinan, Emily N 134 William Street,* Williamsport 

Follmer, Estella May Seminary, Williamsport 

Follmer, Kate Colorado Springs, Colo. 

Frank, Minnie Williamsport 

Gerstenlauer, Margaret 473 Laurel Street, Williamsport 

Gibson, Mary Alice 704 West Edwin Street, Williamsport 

Gohl, Edna M 65 Ross Street, Williamsport 

Greenwood, Ruth 5O6 West Third Street, Williamsport 

Hamilton, Frances 101 Market Street, Williamsport 

Hartman, Carrie 159 Market Street, Williamsport 

Hartman, Edna 159 Market Street, Williamsport 

Hartman, Lula May 212 Chatham Street, Williamsport 

Hess, Eleanor L 333 Louisa Street, Williamsport 

Hess, Esther 333 Louisa Street, Williamsport 



70 



FIFTY-FOURTH ANNUAL CATALOGUB. 



WILLIAMSPORT DICKINSOnIsEMINARY. 



71 



Hileman, Mrs. Jos. B 915 Second Avenue, Williamsport 

Hite, Laura M 453 Pine Street, Williamsport 

Jewett, Elizabeth E 431 West Edwin Street, Williamsport 

Johnson, Mrs. Harry G West Third Street, Williamsport 

Jones, Ruth Williamsport 

Kerb, Alda Mary Roaring Springs 

Kraber, Catherine E 721 Hepburn Street, Williamsport 

Martin, Helen Jersey Shore 

McMurray, Josephine Rex New Washington 

Mendenhall, Aletheia Peace Berwick 

Metzger, Mary Wagner 1006 West Fourth Street, Williamsport 

. Meyer, Delia. . .^^^_^ 325 Centre Street, Williamsport 

Miller, May Lillian WarrensviUe 

Morehead, Kathryn 136 East Canal Street, Williamsport 

Mussina, Mrs. J. Wood 829 Elmira Street, Williamsport 

Mussina, Lauretta 349 Academy Street, Williamsport 

Noroross, Eva Clydessa Philadelphia 

O'Brien, Myrtle J 347 Rural Avenue, Williamsport 

Page, Jennie M 216 East Church Street, Williamsport 

Payne, Belle 733 Hepburn Street, Williamsport 

Pennington, Jennie Belle Bedford 

Pratt, Bertha 1005 Vine Street, Williamsport 

Pratt, Lulu 1005 Vine Street, Williamsport 

Rank, Mrs. F. T 3I8 Market Street, Williamsport 

Reed, Elizabeth Russell 157 Pine Street, Williamsport 

Rhoaus, Mrs. Julia 429 Locust Street, Williamsport 

Rue, Julia Elizabeth Curwensville 

Savidge, Hazel Ehzabeth. . . .147 East Fourth Street, Williamsport 

Seaman Anna Louise ^^^^^^ 

Scholl, K. Florence 326 Park Avenue, Williamsport 

Shaver, Mary Mumper 34 West Main Street, Lock Haven 

Sheef, Anna E -n ,■ 

c, . ,..,,. ■ Burhngame 

Sloatman, Lide Ann 461 East Third Street, Williamsport 

Stanton, Althea r^ss Street, Williamsport 

Strasburger, Jane B East Third Street, Williamsport 

Swartz, Minnie 1 343 pe^n street, Williamsport 

Taylor, Mabel j r^.^ g^^eet, Williamsport 

Thompson, Esther 142 Market Street, Williamsport 

Thompson, Martha 142 Market Street, Williamsport 

Thrall, M.nme goi Elmira Street, Williamsport 

Wasson Stella Alice 814 Centre Street, Wilhamsport 

We.k. Ada A. 470 pme Street, Williamsport 

Wood, Olive Winifred ^j^. ^ 

Yost, Edith May wnue Pine 

Andrus, Frank J '. ;;;;;. '. ;; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ■ ; ; ; ; ; ; ; • ; ; • r^'," t^" 

Bates, Myron Heilman 473 Ea<it Thir,i QtvLlt Vi^n- "^ 

r>ot^„ 13 1, * ^-v •n.asi iniiti btieet, Williamsport 

Bate.s, Robert Gibson 473 East Thir,i Qt-^^t ixrii- . 

Chikote, Clyde Silas ^ ^*'^^*' Wilhamsport 

Shrewsbury 



<: 



Cramer, Harry Griffith Hollsopple 

Davis, Andrew Crocket 346 High Street, Williamsport 

Drake, Carl Vandiver Prostburg, Md. 

Farrington, Harry William 708 Reservoir Street, Baltimore, Md. 

Fellenbaum, Edwin P cedar Lane 

Graham, Willis Aquilla Woolrich 

Hoffman, William Maguire Montgomery 

Holland, Clyde Stuart Holliday 

King, Millard Bartholomew 931 East Third Street, Williamsport 

Knox, Robert James 657 Franklin Street, Williamsport 

McClintock, James 2747 North Fifth Street, Philadelphia 

Norcross, Wilbur Harrington Muhlenburg 

Rutherford, John Lincoln Laurelton 

Savidge, Charles Earl 147 East Fourth Street, Williamsport 

Wilkinson, James Salmon Burlingame 

Willard, Willis Wardner 702 Penn Street,"williamsport 

Williamson, Clarence Hiess Bellwood 



STUDENTS ^N SPECIAL Wnni< 



.y i_ A JL 



Allen, Alice Brown Portland, Mich. 

Almy, Emily White 507 West Fourth Street, Williamsport 

Beyer, Mary Elizabeth Tyrone 

Campbell, Elizabeth Priestley. .44 West Fourth Street, Williamsport 

Clarke, Oleive Blanche Blanchard 

DeLong, Jennie Ruth ^edix Run 

Foley, Edith 848 West Fourth Street, Williamsport 

Gilliland, Julia Claire Karthaus 

GlUiland, Mabelle Olive "'.'.■.■.■.■.■.■.■.■.■.■.■.■.■; .'.Karthaus 

Hamilton, Frances loi Market Street, Williamsport 

Harcourt, Blanche Frances 102 North Fourth Street, Reading 

Ker, Charlotte Munroe.936 Westminster St., N. W.,Washington D C 

Leamy, Caroline Elizabeth Williamsport 

McKiUip, Rebecca Hollidaysburg 

McMurray, Josephine Rex New Washington 

McMurray, Mary Floyd New Washington 

Mundy, Bessie Sarah Bradford 

Palmatier, Mary Mabel .' .' .V.Vcoudersport 

Park, Dessa Marguerite Westover 

Rankin, Jennie A Ben Lomond Street, Uniontown 

Shiffler, Helen East Lawn, Williamsport 

Siers, Ethel May 1714 Thirteenth Street, Altoona 

Smger, Annetta 700 Hepburn Street, Williamsport 

Singer, Rea 700 Hepburn Street, Williamsport 

Stevens, Edith M-ay 447 Pine Street, Williamsport 



72 



FIFTY- FOURTH ANNUAL CATALOGUE. 



Stevens, Jeannette ^^^ t^. „ 

Walters, Ada . .V. "^^ ^'"^ ^^'^^'^' Wllliamsport 

Wasson, Stella Alio,- oiD^' Unlontown 

Wood. Olive Wltifred '" ''"''''' ^'''''' WilUamsport 

Allen, William Henry White Pine 

Boyer, Jonah Willet. ....'.■ '^r'^ m^^XIV '^l ' ' ' I'^^ '"'^mstown 

Davis, Andrew Crocket \T^ I ! Z'^'' '^^"»^">«Port 

Duble, Norman Henry.' .' ' ' ' 'snl^T. ^*''""'' ^""a-^Port 

Gilliland, Ray Dill ^""^ Avenue, Williamsport 

Gilliland, Joseph Murray ' '^"""^ ^^°^ 

McMeans, Charles c;;';; ; ®"°^ ^^""^ 

Hears, William Frederick °^ Avenue, Scranton 

-Meminger, William Hinkle '-^^' ' ' ' "-^ ^^"""^^ ^°'"'' 

Sadler, Isaac Lewis. . Pleasant Valley 

Smith, Walter Brown MaviUe 

EnnisvlUe 



ART DEPARTMENT. 



Bender, Christine Emily... 

Beschorman Mrs F T? V.'r."^ Strasburg 

Flock, Eva Barbara . 62 Lkf'^.^'"'*' ^'^"™°^'" 

Huntley. Francelia Sophia '''"' ^*"""'' Williamsport 

Irvin, Jane Patton Driftwood 

Ker Charlotte Munro • -936 Wes;mins;;;'st;N.w;Washfn™D"c 
McMurray, Mary Floyd ^ •» vv dbnington, D. C. 

Minick, Ruth Jeanetta ^' ^"^ Washington 

Mills, Daisy . * * irr* ^'* V 't^ Ridgrway 

Neece, Mary GerVrude:;V.':- ' ' ^f^lt ^Mr, ^/'l' ^""^-^P-* 
Rankin, Jennie A East Third Street, Williamsport 

Sallade, Mrs. Anna Lloyd .7, Lomond Street, Uniontown 

Sherlock, Alice Ray lo ' rT\ Tf' W""'^'"«P°'-t 

Singer, Annetta .... 700 nLhn «? ^^'"""' ^"°°"^ 

Smith, Mrs. Rollin R... ^ Hepburn Street. Williamsport 

Sturgis, Bessie Edith... Duluth, Minn. 

Walters, Ada Millheim 

Graham. Willis Aquiila Uniontown 

Knoell, Henry rIV',; ■■■■"• Woolrich 

May Charles ... „, "^^'^'^ ^*''^^*' Williamsport 

Sadler. Isaac Lewis" .'i ■.■.■.■.■.■;.■ ^"^ ^*'"^^*' Williamsport 

Savidge. Charles Earl... U7' r^lVt' 'i^'''^^' '^\ Idaville 

^" ^^«t Fourth Street, Williamsport 



WILLIAMSPORT DICKINSON SEMINARY. 



73 



SUMMARY. 



Resident Graduates 

Students in Classical Department .*.' !*.*.V.'.' * o? 

Students in Scientific Department .*.'.*.'*.*.*.*.* ' jg 

Students in Belles Dettres Department.*. */.*.*.'.'.'.*. *.'.'.*.'. * 24 

Students in Modern Language Department. . . .* rr2 

Students in Special Work Vl 

Students in Academic Department. .. ..,. ••;•;;••••• •; • 

Students in Primary Department ^^ 

Students in Elocution and Physical Culture 'Department.* .* 91 

Students in College Preparatory Department "** ii 

Students in Practical Science Department 

Students in History and Literature Department! ! .* .' .* .* .' .* .* .* [ [ ] ] [ ] 2 

MUSIC DEPARTMENT. 

students in Instrumental Music 

Students in Harmony and History .'.*.*. 

Students in Vocal Music 

59 

ART DEPARTMENT. 

students in Oil Painting 

Students in China Painting . . *. *. *. * . '. * '. * .' [' ^ 

Students in Crayon Drawing *.'.*/.* [ ^ 

Students in Water Colors .*.*.*.*.**.**.* I 

Students in Mechanical Drawing ^l 

Students in Pencil Drawing Z 

6 

STUDENTS IN AI,L DEPARTMENTS. 

Ladies 

Gentlemen .... -^^^ 

85 

Whole number .... ' 

271 



74 



FIFTY-FOURTH ANNUAI, CATAI^OGUK. 



ALUMNL 



Names. ^y^,., 

Adams, J. P ,1395 

Ake, J. H 1899 

Akers, Miss Lizzie *.!!!!! **1885 

Albertson, O. H I895 

Alderdice, Miss M. E I897 

♦Alexander, C. T 1853 

Alexander, E. B 1889 

Alexander, Miss Winifred ..1893 

Allen, R. J 1397 

-♦Alien, R. P 1852 

Ames, Miss M. C 1901 

Anderson, Miss Effa G 1895 

Anderson, G. R 1395 

Anderson, Miss Rosa T 1897 

Anderson, S. L i887 

Andrews, W. A .*'.*'. i884 

Armstrong, W. L *1897 

♦Arndt, C. K 1868 

Artley, Miss A. A 1395 

Ash, V. B 1897 

Ash, W. P 1897 

Ault, Miss S. K .*..'."..*!!l898 

Babb, Miss Estella 1897 

Babb, Miss Kate J 1889 

Bain, W. 1 1901 

Baird, Eugene H .......1891 

Baker, E. G 1334 

Baker, G. W !.!l876 

Baker, Miss L. L 1393 

Baker, Miss Margaret 1883 

Baker, W. P 1900 

Baldwin, J. B .!!!.!l881 

Ball, Miss Cora L .'!.*1891 

Ball, Miss S. P \\\\ 1339 

Barber, Miss A. E .1879 

Barker, W. S 1397 

Barnitz, C. M 1390 

Barnitz, S. J 1397 

Barr, Miss Adelle 1880 

Barton, Miss P. A 1865 

*Barton, J. H 136O 

Basil, Miss P. M 1397 

Beck, Miss C. L 1396 

Beck, G. C 1897 

Beck, Miss M. J 1352 

Eeddo w, William .' . .* 1888 

Beers, L. H 1869 

tBell, J. E 1880 

tBender, H. R 1882 

♦Bennett, Allen 1877 

Bennett, Miss H. C 1858 

Bennett, Miss M. P 1884 

Bennett, Miss N. H 1880 

tBenscoter, C. C 1880 

* Deceased. f Honorary. 



Names. d^iss. 

*Benscoter, Miss M. G 1897 

Benscoter, W. E 1393 

Betts, William T ..V.1891 

Beyer, Miss Sarah A ."..*.* 1891 

Beyer, T. P 1393 

Beymer, Miss C. M 1897 

Biddle, Miss E 1351 

Bidlack, S. B .1901 

*Biggs, E. H .*.*.*.*1862 

Bixler, J. W 1373 

Black, Miss Anna S 1889 

Bloom, Miss E. U 1901 

Bloom, Miss G. 1 1901 

Blythe, Miss A. M 1396 

Bodine, DeWitt 1861 

Bowman, A. S .'!l868 

tBowman, J. P 1332 

Bowman, J. H !.*!l881 

Bowman, Miss M. B .*1897 

Bowman, S. L. 1352 

Bowman, S. S !.*1863 

Bowman, Sumner S 1886 

tBowman, Bishop Thos .1898 

Boynton, Miss E 1864 

Brady, L. M 1334 

Bradley, Miss K 1357 

Brenneman, J. E 1397 

Brinton, C. S .'..*.* 1399 

Brown, C. I .'1338 

Brown, H. L 1330 

Brown, J. C 1368 

Brown, J. J 13^7 

Brunstetter, P. H ......1895 

Bryner, C. W 1393 

Bubb, M. B 1398 

""Buckalew, W. J 1371 

Buckley, Miss E. W 1883 

Buckley, Miss S. E 1884 

Burch, Miss E. M 1899 

Burke, E. W 1882 

Burkholder, H. C 1901 

Burnley, C. W 1863 

Burnley, Miss L. H 1893 

Burnley, Miss M. C 1893 

Busey, G. M 1332 

Calder, Miss M 1865 

Campbell, P. C 1863 

Campbell, I. P 1372 

Campbell, Miss M. L 1893 

*Campbell, R. P 1872 

Carnill, S. S 1395 

Carskadon, Miss E. M 1901 

Carter, R. T 1375 

Carver, W. A 1371 



I 



WII.I,IAMSPORT DICKINSON SEMINARY. 



75 



y* 



Names. class 

Cassidy, Miss E. P 1887 

Chamberlain, Miss R. A 1892 

Champion, Miss M 1379 

Chapman, H. O 1868 

Cheston, Miss A. H 1884 

Cheston, H. C I886 

Cheston, Miss M. 1 1397 

*Church, P. E ises 

*Clarke, P. A. C 1372 

Clarke, W. P isso 

Clarke, J. C 1335 

Clarkson, J. A. C 1334 

Cleaver, Miss C. Y * 1876 

Cleaver. Miss L. J rrir. . 1866 

♦Clees, T. O 1363 

Cole, Miss McE. S 1394 

*Comp, J. S !."..*.*." 1869 

Conner, Miss Adella 1889 

Conner, B. C 1371 

Conner, N. S "l899 

Conner, Miss Sallie 1337 

♦Conner, S. J. A 136I 

Conner, S. J. A V.1386 

Cooper, Miss A 1364 

Cooper, Miss A. M **1864 

Cooper, Miss Antoinette "l891 

Cooper, R. W 1337 

Correll, Miss G. V *"*1893 

correii, w. H ;::::i892 

cox, C. S i8g6 

Cramer, Miss M. C 1399 

Crawford, Miss Lavina P "*1855 

Crawford, Miss M. E 1365 

♦Crawford, Mary R 1336 

♦Crawford, Miss R. A 1857 

Creager, C. E 1375 

Creager, Miss E .'*"l900 

Creager, Miss M. 1900 

Creveling, C. C [1395 

Creveling, Miss G. A 1396 

Creveling, Miss Ida B. L 1890 

Creveling, Miss M. L 1887 

Creveling, S. A 13^2 

Crever, Miss A. Rosa *.' ' '1336 

Crotsley, H. H "1386 

Crust, T. L ".Vmo 

Cudhp, J. S 1901 

♦Cummings, Miss L. W *1877 

Curns, Miss M. E 1883 

Curran, H. A 1858 

Dale, Miss P .1872 

Dann, Miss A. D !.!..!.. 1893 

Darby, Miss P. E .* .* 1900 

Dart, Miss L .1875 

Dashiell, Miss A. P .' 1377 

Davis, Miss H. B ! . 1853 

Davis, Miss M. B .1852 

Davis, Miss J. D .'*.'** '1398 

i:)awes, Joseph H *.*.*.** 1391 

Deavor, Miss Ida C ....1887 

* Deceased. 



Names, class. 

Deavor, J. D. W ,1880 

Deavor, E. E. A 1371 

♦Deaver, W. T. S I888 

De Armond, D. A I866 

♦Dempsey, C. W I893 

Detwiler, Miss P. C 1895 

♦Diemer, J. B 1353 

Dietrick, P. P 1371 

Pni, A. H V.V.V;i852 

*Dill, M. R 1863 

gill' W. H 1857 

Drmkle, Miss M. E 1867 

Drum, Miss E. M 1335 

♦Drum, M. L 1357 

Duncan, C. A *.* '1900 

Dunkerly, J. R '..**1878 

Dunkle, W. T 1991 

Ebert, Miss A. M .1860 

Eckbert, Miss A. M 1874 

Eder, Miss M. G 'i884 

Edgar, Miss M .1857 

Edwards, Miss A. C *1881 

Eichelberger, J. Allie 1891 

Elliott, Miss M. P 1352 

Ely, Miss J. A .*!*'l899 

Emery, Miss Eva V !"*1857 

Emery, Miss Lizzie I i860 

Emery, Miss M. P 1357 

Engler S. H V;.i9oo 

♦Ent, W. H 1853 

Essmgton, Miss M. R 1377 

Essington, Miss N. A 1865 

Evans, S. B ;i385 

Everett, Miss Lottie C 1886 

gyer, H. B 1385 

Paunce, J. E 1353 

Paus, Miss Eva R ..!... !l897 

Paus, George W '*1891 

5:ehr, H. A .*.*.*.'l890 

Perguson, Miss H. E 1885 

Fidler, C. L 1369 

Flick, Miss Trella M 1894 

Pollmer, Miss M. E " 1897 

Pollmer, Miss S. M "*1887 

♦Pollmer, W. W 1397 

Pord, Miss A. A ...1898 

Porrest, Miss Anna L .1887 

Porrest, G. L 1393 

♦Poulke, Miss Jennie R *. 1878 

Pox, Miss M. E 1898 

Prain, Edmund W ....1894 

Prancis, J. P 1393 

Freck, H. C :;;i396 

Fredericks, Moore i860 

Fredericks, D. H. M !'..*1862 

Friling, Miss M 1365 

Frost, Miss H. H * 1393 

Frost, W. M 1880 

Prycklund, E 1399 

Fullmer, C. P ...!. 1881 



76 



FIFTY-FOURTH ANNUAI. CATALOGUE. 



^«'"^- ClaM, 

Fullmer, C. L isso 

Furst, A. 1854 

^^J^t, C. G 1852 

Galbraith, Miss A 1899 

Ganoung, Miss C. M 1888 

Garrison, Miss M. R 1897 

Gearhart, H. F 1853 

*Gearhart, W. T 1862 

Gehret, Miss E. L 1883 

Gere, Miss H. A 1852 

Gere, Miss S. F I852 

Gibson, W. S I877 

Gilmore, Miss A. H 1884 

Glenn, G. W. M 1884 

- Glosser, W. E ... .'..1890 

Glover, Miss L. E .!l884 

Goodlander, Miss J. E 1855 

Goodwill, W. F 1875 

Graefe, A. N !.'!.*1898 

Gray, E. J i858 

Gray, Miss E. K I893 

Gray, Etta S 1887 

Gray, J. M. M 1896 

Gray, Miss Myrtle 1893 

Gray, W. E 188I 

Gray, William W 1886 

Grazier, Miss L. A I888 

Green, Miss H. M 1852 

Green, Miss M. A 1855 

Green, Miss J. L, I892 

Greenly, Miss E. M 1888 

Greenly, T i858 

Griggs, Miss B. E 1871 

Grover, D. M 1896 

Guldin, J 1872 

Guss, Miss A. E 1882 

Guss, Miss S. C 1887 

Gutelius, Miss E. M 1899 

Hahn, Miss L. S 1871 

Halenbake, Miss S. E 1862 

Hall, S. P 1897 

Hambleton, C I888 

Hamer H. F 1901 

Hammond, W. S 1874 

*Hammond, W. A 1864 

Hanks, H. R 1876 

Hann, C. G 1878 

Harman, Miss A. E 1868 

Harris, B. A 1896 

Harris, F. G 1873 

Harris, Miss I. P 1870 

Harris, Miss L. R 1872 

Hartman, Miss C 1863 

Hartman, Franklin E 1891 

Hartman, L. B 1897 

Hartman, W. W 1892 

Hartsock, F. D 1890 

Hartsock, H. W 1898 

Hartzell, Miss A. M. C 1883 

Hartzell, C. V 1879 

* Deceased, f Honorary. 



WILLIAMSPORT DICKINSON SEMINARY. 



Names. class. 

Harvey, J. C I88O 

Haughawout, Miss L. M 1883 

Haughawout, Miss S. F 1862 

Haupt, G. W I860 

Heafer, Miss Louise 1890 

Heck, Albert S .1887 

Heck, O. G '.**1884 

Heckman, Miss A M 1901 

Heckman, E. R I894 

Heckman, Miss Helen B .*.". 1891 

Heading, B. E 1895 

Hedges, Miss E. V 1879 

Heilman, Miss M 1894 

Heilman, R. P I874 

tHeilner, S. A .*.!.*!l876 

Heim, C. F 1875 

Heisley, Miss R. N 1852 

Hepburn, A. D 1862 

*Herr, Miss A. M I86I 

Hill, Miss A 1881 

Hill, George H 1391 

Hill, H. R ;;:i892 

Hillman, George M 1891 

Himes, T. B i865 

Hippie, T. C 1865 

Hitchins, H i876 

Hively, B. W .'!.\'l896 

tHoag, Miss C. J I895 

Hollopeter, S. G. M 1865 

*Hontz, A. W 1890 

Hooper, Miss M. Lr [ 'i893 

Hooven, Miss E. R V...1887 

Hooven, Miss M. M !!l886 

Hooven, T. M .1897 

Hoover, W. R ...V.1885 

Horning, Miss B. E 1898 

Houck, Miss G. H .' 1881 

Houck, U. G 1889 

Houck, W. L 1892 

Howes, Miss A 1864 

Howland, Miss M. A .*!.'.'l893 

Hunter, L. H 1884 

Huntley, G. W., Jr V.'.1889 

Huntley, Miss L. J I888 

Hursh, Miss L. M 1882 

Hutchinson, J. G 1862 

Hutchinson, W. L 1884 

*Hyman, Miss J. S .*!!.'!!l880 

*Hyman, Miss S. R i860 

Ilgenfritz, E. F 1900 

Irvin, Miss N. V .*1900 

♦Jackson, C. G 1858 

*James, J. Harry I866 

James, W. M i878 

Janney, L. R [ 1374 

John, D. C ;:i865 

*John, G. W 1858 

John, R. R 1890 

Johns, J. E 1886 

Johns, William 1884 



77 



Names. class. 

Johnson, Miss Jean 1890 

Johnson, Miss G. Lr 1900 

Johnston, G. G I893 

Johnston, Miss M. W 1899 

Jones, Miss C. Lois 1895 

Jones, Miss J. L 1884 

Jones, Miss M. E 1900 

Jones Miss S. T .1872 

Joyce, Elijah ..1857 

Kalbfus, Charles H 1852 

Keefer, Miss Ella 1884 

Keeley, E. B '.1901 

Kerslake, J. J 1900 

Kessler, Miss E. M .! !'.' !l887 

Kiess, H. S i898 

Kimball, A. W ..1881 

King, Miss Ada I877 

King, G. E 1876 

*Kirk, Miss N. A I88O 

Kitchen, Miss Q. R 1896 

*Kline, E D 1868 

Kline, Miss S. M I888 

Koch, E. V 1880 

Koch, Miss Ida E I886 

Koch, Miss Laura M 1886 

Koller, Miss Louise .!l891 

Konkle, W. B i878 

Kress, Miss A. M ..1893 

Kress, Miss E. H I893 

Kress, W. C .".1859 

Kurtz, Miss Mary K *1895 

*Landis, J. W ..1857 

Lamed, F. W '188O 

Law, F. S 1868 

Leidy, Miss M. B 1885 

Leonard, H. E !!l893 

Levan, Miss M !.1864 

Lincoln, Miss A. R * 1893 

*Lincoln, Miss H. M .'i884 

Little, William F I888 

Lloyd, A. P 1879 

Long, H. E .!..*.*.*1878 

Long, Miss J. M 1884 

Loudenslager, Miss R. S 1867 

1 Love, J. K 1877 

♦Loveland, R., Jr ...1876 

Lovell, Miss A. M I866 

Low, Miss Alice L 1896 

Lowe, Miss Emma !.1857 

*Lowe, Miss A. S !.*1863 

Lowe, J. W * 1877 

Macintosh, Miss J. M .*.*.'.' I8O8 

Mack, Miss M. E 1901 

Madara, J. W I87Q 

*Madill, G. A '!!.**..*.".*!.*.*1858 

Madoro, B. F 1892 

Mahoney, J. F 1901 

*Malin, Miss E ***1861 

Mallalieu, Miss B. J "i890 

Mallalieu. W. S ;;i9oi 

* Deceased. f Honorary. 



Names. 



Clasi. 



*Markle, A. M I871 

Martyn, C. S .' 'l887 

Mason, Miss T .V1866 

Massey, Miss A. E ! * 1864 

Massey, Miss M. E 1873 

May, W. A " 1873 

McBride, Miss L R .' I895 

McCloskey, C. E '1895 

*McCloskey, M. J I875 

McCloskey, Miss M. L .1894 

McCollum, Miss M. E 1890 

McCord, Miss Mary I853 

tMcCormick, H. G **1895 

McCullough, Miss M. B 1895 

McCullough, Miss M. J 1877 

McDowell, A 1866 

*McDowell, Miss C * 1866 

*McDowell, H. W * '1888 

McDowell, Miss 1 1865 

McDowell, Lewis J 1891 

McDowell, Miss L *.*."** 1901 

McDowell, T. A ..1895 

McGraw, J. R 1886 

Mclntire, Miss Z. B .*!.*. 1890 

McKee, Miss N. E. B 1882 

McMurtrie, H. H I897 

McNemar, Miss D. C " * 1896 

McWilliams, D. A I886 

Mearkle. W. W I897 

Melick, O. B ......1864 

Melshimer, J. A 1878 

*Mendenhall, H. S !*..'l853 

*Metzger, Miss E. Z 1879 

Metzger, Miss E. Z ....1900 

Metzger, Miss H. M 1888 

Metzler, O S 188O 

Millard, Miss M. E 1894 

Miller, A. G ;;i888 

Miller, Miss B. E 1900 

Miller, J. M ' I875 

Miller, Miss J. R ...1860 

Mills, Miss Daisy I894 

Milnes, Miss L. H .1885 

Minds, Miss E. A I893 

Minds, J. H 1893 

Minds, Miss E. M ! 1901 

Mingle, H. B. 

Mitchell, Miss 

Mitchell, 

Mitchell, 

Mock, S. 

Moore, 

Moore, 



Miss 
Max 
U.... 

Miss B. 

R. S... 



M. 
M. 
L. 



J. 
L. 



B 



1895 

1865 

1885 

1885 

1899 

1890 

1886 

Moore, S. G 186I 

Morgart, H. M ......1887 

Mosser, Miss Annie !."..'" 1882 

Mosser, B. H * ' '1877 

Mortimer, J. H V. 1881 

Moul, C. B 1878 

tMoyer, H. C 1 .'.'.'!.*.*! I.*.* 1882 



78 



FIFTY-FOURTH ANNUAL CATALOGUE. 



J— 



Names, Class. 

Mulf ord, Miss E. B 1887 

Mulliner, Miss B. A 1896 

Mulliner, Miss G. L 1896 

Murray, Miss M. A 1897 

Murray, Thomas H 1867 

Musser, Miss M. E 1881 

Mussina, Miss H 1862 

Mussina, Miss L 1861 

Mussina, Miss M. H 1864 

*Nash, Miss F. E 1865 

Nash, Miss K. E 1860 

Neal, Miss E. B 1898 

Neal, E. W 1900 

Needy, Carl W 1886 

*Neff, J. 1 1861 

tNeeley, T. B 1891 

Nicodemus, S. D 1874 

Norcross, W. H 1865 

Norris, Miss Sadie R 1886 

Novenski, Miss A. M 1898 

Oliver, Miss A. S 1861 

Olmstead, Miss E 1875 

Ohnstead, Miss M 1875 

Olmsted, E. F 1899 

Opp. J. A 1870 

Osman, T. Milton 1891 

Ott, L. D 1885 

Oyler, R. S 1898 

*Packer, Miss M 1852 

Packer, Miss S. B 1852 

Pardoe, Miss M. H 1885 

Parlett, Miss M. 1897 

Pearce, Miss A. M 1876 

Pearce, Miss Bessie 1877 

Pearre, A 1858 

tPeaslee, C. L 1898 

Penepacker, W. F 1896 

Pentz, H. L 1900 

Petty, Miss Edyth 1895 

Petty, Miss E. G 1895 

Pidcoe, A. S 1886 

Piper, C. B 1897 

Piper, E. F 1896 

*Poisal, R. E 1858 

Pomeroy, W. R 1885 

Porter, E. A 1898 

Porter, Miss E. S 1866 

♦Pott, R. R 1858 

Price, L. M 1894 

Purdy, Miss Mary P 1889 

Pyles, E. A 1893 

Rankin, H. L 1896 

Ransom, Miss K. E 1867 

Reeder, W. F 1875 

Reeder, R. K 1878 

Reeser, I. J 1888 

Reider, Miss Bertha A 1886 

Reider, Miss Mary L. 1891 

Reighard, Miss S. S 1866 

Remley, G. M 1892 

* Deceased. f Honorary. 



WILLIAMSPORT DICKINSON SEMINARY. 



Names, Class. 

Rentz, W. F 1874 

Reynolds, S. A 1874 

Rex, J. B 1878 

Riale, Miss H. E 1885 

Rice, Miss M. F 1900 

Rich, Charles, O'N 1894 

Rich, Miss J. F 1900 

Rich, Miss M. A 1896 

Richards, Miss E. L 1873 

Riddle, E. C 1877 

Riddle, Miss E 1854 

Riddle, Miss J. D 1893 

Riddle, Miss M. E 1854 

Rigdon, Nathan 1897 

Robeson, W. F 1882 

Robeson, Miss M 1880 

Robins, Miss M. E 1884 

Rockwell, Miss Estella 1889 

Rosenberry, G. W 1894 

Rothfuss, Miss Phoebe 1882 

Rounsley, S. F 1896 

Rue, J. W 1877 

Rudisill, Miss J. E 1901 

Russell, Miss J. S 1885 

Russell, Miss M. J 1892 

Rutherford, Miss F. H 1901 

Sadler, W. F 1863 

Salter, B. A 1899 

Sang-ree, P. H 1865 

Sarver, S. J 1897 

Saxon, Benjamin F 1891 

Saylor, Miss J. S 1862 

♦Scarborough, G. H 1878 

Schoch, A 1862 

*Schofield, E. L 1862 

Scholl, Miss M. A 1897 

Schrade, Miss A. M 1898 

Scott, Alex 1901 

Scoville, Miss J. E 1863 

Schuchart, H. J 1900 

Sechler, W. A 1883 

Seeley, Miss M. W...... 1900 

Sensenbach, Miss A. V 1893 

Sydow, Albert 1893 

Shaffer, H. P 1900 

Shale, J. H 1896 

Shammo, Miss F. E 1879 

tShaver, J. B 1891 

Sheaffer, W. J 1890 

Shick, Miss Mary M 1886 

Shipley. Miss Ida A 1887 

Shoemaker, Miss M. F 1901 

Shoff, H. M 1895 

Shoop, W. R 1883 

♦Showalter, Miss A. B 1885 

Showalter, H. M 1898 

Skillington, J. E 1900 

Slate, Miss A. B 1892 

Slate, Miss F. W 1894 

Slate, G., Jr 1899 



79 



<"■• 



Names. 

Sleep, F. G 

Sliver, W. A 

Smith, Miss A. G 

Smith, A. H 

*Smith, H. E 

Smith, N. B 



Class. 

.1896 
.1862 
.1899 
.1900 
1866 
1872 



Smith, T. J 2861 

Snyder, Miss A. C... *.'.'.*** 1901 

Snyder, Miss E igg^ 

Souder, Miss R. L iges 

Spang-ler, J. L !.*' 1871 

Speakman, Melville K .' 1391 

Speyerer, Miss A. E '. I899 

Sponsler, E. E 1901 

Spottswood, Miss A. E.. V. *.'.*.*." *1873 

Spottswood, Miss L. M 1865 

Sprout, B. B 1397 

Stabler, Miss C. E '.*.*.'. 1398 

Stackhouse, Miss E. A 1885 

Steck, Miss M. V .**"l900 

Steinmitz, J. L [[[ iggg 

Stephens, H. M *.*.*.*.*.*.. 1888 

Sterling-, Miss E. K .**..'.* I888 

Stevens, E. M "l882 

Stevens, G.W '.'.'.'.'/.'.'.'.mi 

Stevens, J. C 1835 

Stevenson, W. H. 1333 

Stewart, H.L *.*.'.':.'.'.* i.': ::::i896 

Stewart, J. S 1333 

Stoltz, Miss R. J *.*.*. 1373 

Stout, Miss P. R *. 1833 

Strine, Miss M. J iggo 

*Strohm, W. H 1379 

Strong, Miss H. A !]"*'l880 

Stuart, Miss May T *188^ 

Swartz, Miss B. M .*.*.' 1390 

Swartz, Miss E. B 1390 

Swartz, T S V.V;.V;i885 

Swengle, D. F i3gn 

Swope, I. N 1379 

Taneyhill, C. W icfio 

Taneyhill, G. L .' 1353 

Taneyhill, Miss M. E "l857 

Taneyhill, O. B '**1877 

Taneyhill, Miss S. A .**. 1353 

Taylor, Miss Ida A ' 1375 

*Tayior, Miss Jennie M *" '1886 

Taylor, J. W *'*'l863 

Taylor, Miss M. V '.'.'.'. '.'.'.'.'.189Q 

Taylor, R S 1332 

Teitsworth, E. T 1007 

Test, Miss as ::::;v.v.v.;i88i 

Tewell, J. R 133^ 

Thomas, Miss M. Maud..'..*.* 1894 

Thomas, Miss Nellie M I894 

Thomas, Miss Sadie D '*1876 

Thrush, Miss K. A " * '1375 

Tibbins, P. McD ""iQon 

Tibbits, MissC. B *. 1899 

Tomlinson, F. H *.*.*1886 

* Deceased. f Honorary. 



Names. 



Class, 



* 



Tomlinson, Miss M. E I88O 

Tonner, A. C "*1853 

Townsend, W. F 1336 

Tracy, Miss M. P .'. 1390 

*Treverton, Henry 1337 

Treverton, Miss Minnie *. 1887 

Troxell, Miss M. A * " '1390 

Vail, Miss R. C " ' "1869 

Vanderslice, J. A .*.*.* 1863 

Vanfossen, Miss Ada 1357 

Vansant, Miss M. E ***1896 

Volkmar, W 1333 

Wakefield, Miss Ainiee. '.'.'. 7"^^" *isqq 

Walker, F. C 1390 

Walker, M. N .* {§94 

Wallace, Miss Carrie P "isqi 

Waliis, P. M HIq 

Waltz, Miss M. Bertha. 1391 

Warehime, O. C icoi 

Watson, F. A log! 

Watson, Miss F. E 1365 

*Way, E. F 10^9 

Weigel, D. H *.*. jogo 

Weisel, Miss E. A loqr: 

*V/elch, Miss M. P '***1890 

Welteroth, Miss E. M.... '***isq^ 

Welty, Miss M. P Ts?^ 

*Whaley, H V.*.*. 1854 

Whitney, H. H Ull 

Wilcox, Miss E. G *"lSQfi 

Williams, A. S S 

Wilson, Miss C. G 1393 

Wilson, Miss Helen E.... '**1885 

^!}««"'H. L ::;.'.*.*::i898 

Wilson, James E 1336 

Wilson, J. L ifiOQ 

Wilson, s. D :;::; ^833 

Winegardner, Miss S. H. ..*..*.'.*.*.** 1370 
Winger, J. I jo'^ 

^«^^' «. H :::.*;:::::i9oo 

Wood, J. Perry 1397 

Woodin, Miss Dora .'.'.*.' 1364 

Woodward, J 1867 

*Wright, Miss Ida mV. *.*.'. fl?? 

♦Yetter, Miss M iIq\ 

Yocum, E. H i3g3 

Yocum, George C '.'.'.['.'.'.'.mi 

*Yocum, G M 1360 

Yocum, J J i3g3 

*Yocum, Miss N loro 

York, J. H Jnoi 

Young, Miss C. B -loqa 

Young, C. V. P ^895 

Young, Edwin P 1399 

Young, J. B ;; i3gg 

Young, J. W. A '"'iss'? 

*Young, W. Z ^877 

*Ziders, Miss Minnie 1875 

*Ziders, Miss V. S issi 

♦Zollinger, Miss E. A *1882 



8o 



FIFTY-FOURTH ANNUAL CATALOGUE. 



INSTRUMENTAL MUSIC. 



Names, 



Class. 



Apker, Miss L. E 1399 

Barclay, Miss G. E ...1888 

Barkle, Miss E. S I895 

Basil, Miss F. M ..1897 

*Bender, Miss Anna M 1884 

Benscoter, Miss H. C 1895 

Billmeyer, Miss P 1898 

Blint, Miss N. M '...1888 

Bowman, Miss M. B ....1896 

Brooks, Miss Laura I879 

Burkhart, Miss C. E....... *.'.*1895 

Cassidy, Miss E. F 1887 

Champion, Miss Mag-gie 1879 

Chilcoat, Miss Marguerite M....1891 

Chrisman, Mary E 1892 

Comp, Miss C. M *.V. 1895 

Correll, Miss E. G 1896 

Creager, Miss M. 1900 

Creveling, Miss M. L 1900 

Davies, Miss E. C 1890 

Davis, Miss A. R 1901 

Davis, Miss Clara ,,[ 1882 

Ely, Miss A. E .1893 

Eschenbach, Miss Sophia ..1881 

Eyer, Miss M. S 1888 

Frost, Miss H. H 1898 

Fry, Miss E. M I888 

Fulmer, Miss J. A 1896 

Gable, Miss Annie 1884 

Ganoe, Miss M. Lauretta .'..1891 

Gehret, Miss Ella L 1881 

Glover, Miss Fannie S ..1883 

Gohl, Miss M. F 1901 

Gray bill. Miss J 1901 

Green, Miss J. D I893 

Greer, Miss H. L 1896 

Harrington, Miss H. M 1896 

Heck, Miss Clcmma 1889 

Heim, Miss D 1900 

Heinsling, Miss J. M 1887 

Hicks, Miss Blanche L 1891 

Hicks, Miss G. W 1889 

Hoagland, Miss E. M 1897 

Hooper, Miss M. L 1893 

Horn, Miss Mamie D 1881 

Horning, Miss B. E 1899 

Houck, Miss Gertrude H 1880 

Hullar, Miss Annie 1884 

Hutchinson, Wilbur L 1884 

Kelley, Miss R. M 1895 

King, Miss A. W 1895 

King, Miss G. M 1898 

Koch, Miss L. M 1887 

Koons, Miss M. E 1897 

Krape, Miss S. M 1895 

Laedlein, Miss C. E 1895 

Larned, Miss Minnie 1894 

* Deceased. 



Names. 



Class. 



Leamy, Miss R. E 1899 

Leckie, Miss Ida M 1883 

Leidy, Miss Margaret B 1885 

Levi, Miss C. M 1900 

Low, Miss H. M 1889 

Maitland, Miss Anna 1880 

Malaby, Miss E. V 1893 

Mallalieu, Miss B. J 1890 

♦Martin, Miss Chloe 1887 

McGee, Miss E. M 1895 

McGee, Miss L H ..1895 

McMurray, Miss E. A 1895 

Menges, Miss M. A 1893 

Metzger, Miss H. M 1889 

Mertz, Miss L. B... 1892 

Millspaugh, Miss L. C 1886 

Mulliner, Miss G. L 1897 

Musser, Miss Minnie E 1880 

Nuss, Miss Laura 1884 

Ohl, Miss Ella A 1891 

Paine, Miss J. F 1896 

Pardoe, Miss Minnie H 1885 

Plummer, Miss L. M 1901 

Pooler, George W 1880 

Prior, Miss E. M 1888 

Randall, Miss Josie 1882 

Reider, Miss Edith 1893 

Rhoads, Miss Mary V 1891 

Riddell, Miss Claude 1885 

Ripley, Miss Ossie 1880 

Robbins, Miss S. 1 1889 

Rothrock, Miss E. M 1889 

Rothrock, Miss Maggie 1879 

Rothrock, Miss S M 1888 

Runyan, Miss F. J 1888 

*Ryan, Miss M. L 1889 

Shaw, Amos R 1882 

Sanders, Miss C. E 1889 

Shaffer, Miss C. E 1899 

Sharpless, Miss M. L 1889 

Sheadle, Miss R. R 1886 

Sheets, Miss Lulu 1887 

Shopbell, Miss May L 1887 

Slate, Miss Crecy 1879 

Smith, Miss G. A 1890 

Stitzer, Miss G. E 1901 

Stratford, Miss Kittie 1885 

Stuart, Miss May T 1880 

Swartz, Miss M. E 1888 

Tallman, Miss G 1898 

Titus, Miss Anna 1880 

Turley, Miss Mattie 1885 

Unterecker, Miss F. E 1898 

Voelker, Miss L. S 1886 

Wait, Miss A. M 1896 

Wallis, Miss M. Lulu 1891 

Wanamaker, Miss C. M 1892 






WII.LIAMSPORT DICKINSON SEMINARY. 



81 



Names. 



Class. 



Watson, Miss E. M 1893 

Weddigen. Miss Wilhelmine.. ..1891 
Wilde, E. W 1882 



Names. 



Class. 



Zeth, Miss Minnie 1887 



Williams, Miss Minnie 1884 

* Williamson, Miss O. H 1887 

Wilson, Miss E. E 1898 



* Deceased. 



VOCAL MUSIC. 



Names. 



Class. 



Huntley, Miss F. S 1894 

Koons, G. J 



Names. 

McGee, Miss E. M 
1895 



Class. 
.1895 



ELOCUTION. 



Names. (ji^^^ 

Barker, W. S , I897 

Barkle, Miss E. S I895 

Blythe, Miss A. M ...1896 

Bowman, Miss Hannah 1897 

Burch, Miss M. G 1901 

DeWald, Miss L. S '.1896 

Ely, Miss J. A '1899 

Feg-ley, Miss B. V ....1896 

Hanks, Miss F. B 1898 

Hartman, Miss B. M ...1895 



Names. 



Class. 



Kolbe, Miss D. G 1898 

Lundy, Miss L. M .1897 

Massey, Miss S. J 1896 

McGee, Miss E. M I895 

Mills, Miss Daisy 1896 

Parlett, Miss M. 1897 

Pierson, Miss B. L 1897 

Rutherford, Miss F. H 1901 

Wilson, Miss E. E 1898 

Younken, Miss B. M 1897 



ART. 



Names. 



Class. 



Brooks, Miss C. O 1887 

Conner, Miss Sallie ' * *1889 

Dittmar. Miss E. A '1886 

Eder, Miss Mary 1891 

Everhart, Miss Kate .*1879 

Finney, Miss Grace B I886 



Names. 



Class. 



Guss, Miss Maggie 1883 

Harvey, Miss Carrie 1379 

Hinckley, Miss G 1898 

Mann, Miss L. Amelia 1885 

Neece, Miss M. G 1397 

Thompson, Miss Crecy L 1882 



COLLEGE PREPARATORY. 



Names. 

Bailey, J. R 

Bartch, Miss F. P. 
Belt, Miss M. A.... 

Birdsall, R. N 

Bowman, J. R 

Cardon, W. L 

Conner, Miss M. C 
DeFrehn, J. J, 



Class. 



1896 

1896 

1898 

1898 

1896 

1898 

1896 

1898 

Drum, J. Marcellus ....1891 

Ebner, J. R ig^^ 

Faus, Miss D. L 1900 

*Ffeck, C. W V.V."**1895 

Ganoe, W. A 1393 

* Deceased. 



Names. 



Class. 



Gilbert, Miss C. C 1900 

Gould, William H. G .".1891 

Kessler, H. D ..1896 

King, Miss A. W ....1895 

Kinsloe, J. H ISdH 

Levan, J. K .....!.!l898 

Low, T. H 1897 

Lyon, C. E 1398 

McClure, Miss A. V ....!.. 1900 

McMorris, Harry 1393 

Miller, D. N .....1896 

Moore, H. B !!! 1895 

Olmsted, J. T *' 1900 



FIFTY-FOURTH ANNUAL CATAI.OGUE. 



Names. 



Class. 



Parrish, S. R. W 1892 

Penepacker, C. F 1898 

Richards, J. R 1894 

Richardson, Miss H. H 1900 

Soderling, Walter I895 

Sterner, C. P 190a 



Names. 



Class. 



Stutsman, P. V iggg 

Thomas, Walter ,, ,\ I893 

Thompson, J. V *.*.*. '.'.1898 

Wallace, W. C 1894 

Wallis, H. K .".."..".1892 



NORMAL ENGLISH. 



^^'^^' Class. 

Body, Miss Kate R 1889 

Bowman, J. D 1901 

Hoffman, E. E \,\\ 1888 

Hubbard, G. H 1892 



Names. 



Class. 



McKenty, T. W 1393 

M»ler, D. L 1888 

Miller, E. M I894 

Yount, J. w.r^7T-rT-.-.-rr.^.— rrri.\*.*i898 



HISTORY AND LITERATURE. 



Names. 



Huntting, Miss F. J 



Sraub, J. R 



Class. Names. 

.1900 Oliver, Miss E. G 
1899 



Class. 
.1901 



1 



WILIvIAMSPORT DICKINSON SEMINARY. 



83 



l-L^i 



\ V 



VS. 



1. During the hours of study the students shall not be un- 
necessarily absent from their rooms. 

2. At the time appointed to attend prayers, recitation, hc- 
ture, or other exercises, each student shall repair quietly and 
promptly to the place designated. 

3. At no time shall any student loiter in the halls or about 
the doors, or indulge in jumping, wrestling, or loud talking, 
whistling or any unnecessary noise, OR USE TOBACCO IN 
THE BUILDINGS OR ON THE GROUNDS. 

4. The students shall not be absent from their rooms at 
night or after the hour of study indicated by the ringing of the 
bell, nor shall they attend parties or mixed assemblies without 
permission from the President ; nor shall they at any time visit 
hotels or other places of public resort, or on any occasion in- 
dulge in the use of intoxicating liquors. 

5. All profane and indecent language, playing at games of 
chance, injuring the property of the Institution or of citizens, 
quarreling, fighting, the carrying of firearms or other danger- 
ous weapons, are strictly forbidden. 

6. No student shall leave the corporate limits of the city 
for a longer period than one hour, without permission from the 
President. 

7. Each student will be held strictly accountable for any 
damage he or she may cause to the Seminary property. Dam- 
ages by unknown parties may be assessed on the School. 

8. The teachers must at all times have access to the students' 
rooms, and if it be judged necessary, the rooms will be cleaned 
at the expense of the occupants. 

9. Cleanliness of person and apparel, and a gentlemanly and 
lady-like deportment, must be observed by all. 

TO. No w^ter, dirt, or other material shall be thrown from 



84 



FIFTY-FOURTH ANNUAL CATAI.OGUK. 



any window in the building, or in the halls after they have been 
cleaned. 



II. 



Students must have their rooms swept and in order and 



!llt1 



re- 



lights extinguished at the established hours, when all 
tire for the night. 

12. No student will be allowed to go bathhig, hoatini;, .kat- 
mg, fishing, gunning or riding, without permission fmm the 
President. 

— 13. The students must not visit the kitchen, dining room, or 
any other room, except their own, without permission. 

14. The Sabbath must be strictly observed by all. Visiting 
or receiving visits will not be allowed. All must attend public 
worship twice during the day unless excused. 

15- No lady shall at any time receive calls from gentlemen 
at her own room. Friends from a distance can see the ladies in 
the parlor. 

16. The young ladies will not be allowed to leave the Semi- 
nary grounds at any time without permission ; and the gentle- 
men will be restricted at the discretion of the Faculty. 

17. No student shall change his or her room, or place at the 
table, without special permission from the President. 

18. No student will be permitted to leave the School dur- 
ing the session without an express request from the parent or 
guardian, made to the President, and without the consent of the 
Faculty. 

19. Any student who, without just cause, shall fail to at- 
tend the examinations, will be considered under censure. 

20. Permission to be absent from any exercises must be ob- 
tained, if possible, before the absence occurs. 

21. No student will be permitted to leave any class without 
the consent of the Faculty. 

22. The ladies and gentlemen must not visit each other's 
apartments, walk or ride together, without permission, nor con- 
verse together from the windows. 



WH,I.IAMSPORT DICKINSON SEMINARY. 



85 



2^, Students from the neighborhood will not be permitted 
to visit home at such times as will interfere with the regular ex- 
ercises of the School. 

24. Any off(ii(linp; c^nni^^^^^ niay be punished, according to 
the nature of the offense, h\ private or i)uhlic reproof, :,iibpcn- 
sion, dismission or expiilsiun. 

25. Students dismissed or expelled must leave the premises 
at once. 

26. None but students can attend the Society meetings, nor 
shall the Societies meet together, unless by express permissiort 
of the President. 

2y, No special meeting of the students shall be held at any 
time, nor shall any meeting of the students or Societies con- 
tinue later than 9.45 o'clock P. M., without permission of the 
President. 

28. No Society or Association shall be organized, or allowed 
to exist among the students except those organized under a 
Constitution and By-Laws approved by the President and 
Board of Directors and whose place and times of meeting shall 
be fixed by the President of the Seminary. 

29. All persons visiting students at the Seminary will be re- 
quired to conform to the rules adopted for the government of 
the School. Visitors will be charged for boarding at the pub- 
lished rates. 

30. No student will be allowed to change from a higher to a 
lower course of study during the year. 

31. Any temporary prudential regulation for the govern- 
ment of the School that the Faculty may see fit to adopt shall be 
equally binding with these By-Laws. 



86 



FIFTY-FOURTH ANNUAI. CATALOGUE. 



OPINIONS OF PATRONS AND FRIENDS. 



That the pnbHc mnv kiunv tlie cstimnte |>la,(\M] upon the 
Seminal y by those wiiu :ire esiK'Ciallr acijuaiiited with it^ 
maaagenient ntid work, we a|)])eTi(i some testimonials reeeived 
recently from patrons and intiuh : 

REV. DR. EDWARD J. GRAY, ^^^^^^^^^^^^RT, April 26, 1902. 

Dear Sir: Having been a patron of Wiliiamsport Dickinson Semi- 
nary for several years past, and having become familiar with the 

' i^f'^fL rV^r^'"";.^ ^^?^ ^^^^ ^^ ^^y^^^ ^^^^ i^ ^y judgment it is one 
ot the best educational institutions in the country. I am persuaded 
that any student who will make a reasonable use of his or her time 
and opportunities can obtain an education at this institution that will 
thoroughly fit him or her for any occupation in life. It is a sa'fe 
school and thoroughly equipped to do the work it assumes to do Its 
management is excellent. h. T. AMES, 

Attorney-at-Law. 

RIDGWAY, Pa., April 2d, 1902. 
It gives me great pleasure to say a kind word in behalf of Wil- 
iiamsport Dickinson Seminary. My daughter has been a student in 
the institution for the past two years, and the mental and moral 
training she is receiving is so thorough that I entertain no fear for 
her future suc<iess, but feel that she is being fitted for any sphere in 

Wishing you and the institution may live long and prosper, I am 

Yours respectfully, 

T^ , ^ . . C. G. MINICK, 

±5ark and Land Superintendent for Elk Tanning Co. 

CLEARFIELD, PA., April, 29, 1902. 
Three members of my family have attended the Seminary and I 
expect to send one or two others in the near future. I have a hi^h an- 
preciation of the institution, especially of its discipline and moral 
and religious influence. Parents can feel perfectly safe to put their 
children under the care of Rev. Edward J. Gray, D. D., and this s 
more than can be said of the presidents of some other institutions 

Very sincerely, J. e. GEARHART. 

HASTINGS, PA., April 28, 1902. 
Wiliiamsport Dickinson Seminary possesses home comforts health - 
fulness, good discipline and the best facilities for mental and moral 
cu ture, while it prepares its students for all elevating social re- 
quirements. Being a patron for several years, these features com- 
mend themselves to me, and with pleasure I commend the school to 
all seeking educational advantages. 

J. HORNING, Pastor M. E. Church. 

RAMEY, PA., April 29, 1902. 
My knowledge of Wiliiamsport Dickinson Seminary was obtained 
nfio • T..^f, ^^ children— a son and two daughters— graduating at 
this institution of learning. I consider it a first-class school in every 



i 



\. ^ 



WII<I,IAMSPORT DICKINSON SEMINARY. 



87 



respect. The care they receive and the protection thrown about them, 
I consider equal to the parental roof. For location, health and clean- 
liness it cannot be excelled. 

T mn heartily recommond those wishing to educate their children 

iu \\u- Sefninnrv nt ^VIll!.•! rnspnrt. Pa. 

JAMES H. MTNDS, Coal operator. 

BEECH CREEK, April, 1902. 

1 gladly ipcotuiutjiid Williaiiiispui L Dickinsuii Seminary Lu parents 
seeking a good school for their children, or to any one seeking a 
liiglu r education. Having a son a graduate of this institution I know 
it to be noted for its healthfulness, home comforts, and facilities for 
excellent mental and moral training. 

J. E. TIBBINS, M. D. 

RALSTON, PA., April 30, 1902. 
After having one son graduate and two daughters take a partial 
course at Wiliiamsport Dickinson Seminary, we are glad to say we have 
been much pleased with the school, and expect to have another son 
enjoy its splendid privileges the coming school year. 

Yours fraternally, 

F. ADAMS, Pastor M. E. Church. 

SUNBURY, PA., April 30, 1902. 
I cheerfully commend Wiliiamsport Dickinson Seminary to such 
as may be seeking to acquire a higher education, and to parents who 
may desire to [place their children irv a school well located from a sani- 
tary standpoint, with many home comforts, excellent discipline and 
with superior facilities for mental and moral culture. My informa- 
tion relative to the school is chiefly derived from my two daughters, 
each of whom spent three years in the Seminary as a student. 

Respectfully, 

URIAS BLOOM, Cashier of Bank. 

MADISON, N. J., April 26, 1902. 

Three delightful, profitable years a student make it a pleasure for 
me to state that a thorough. Christian training can be secured at 
Wiliiamsport Dickinson Seminary. The firm but kindly discipline 
induces and fosters habits of study and the spirit of self-mastery. 
The dignified social life of the school is uplifting and refining; the 
Christian infiuence ennobling; the intellectual training most excel- 
lent; the morals of the school such as tend toward noblest character. 

To all who desire a good education, I most heartily recommend Wil- 
iiamsport Dickinson Seminary. 

J. HOWARD AKE, Student Drew Theological Seminary. 

LEWISTOWN, PA., April 28, 1902. 
For twenty-seven years I have been in close touch with the Semi- 
nary, three years a student, graduating in 1881, my wife a student 
later, my daughter graduating 1902, and three years pastor of the 
Mulberry Street Methodist Episcopal Church. I can conscientiously 
testify to the efficiency of the President, Dr. Edward James Gray, the 
common sense discipline, the splendid moral tone, and the thorough 
mental drill of the students. Endowment is a pressing need of the 
school. G. W. STEVENS, Pastor M. E. Church. 

BALTIMORE, MD., April, 1902. 

From my knowledge of Wiliiamsport Dickinson Seminary, through 
my daughter's life there, I consider the mental training very thorough, 
the care for physical condition of the student exceedingly thoughtful, 



88 



FIFTY-FOURTH ANNUAL CATALOGUE, 



WILLIAMSPORT DICKINSON SEMINARY. 



and the moral influence of the very best. I can therefore riiPArf„ii„ 
recommend it to any parent who is seeking ai^^t-clatsThoolwhiie 
mmd, body and spirit shall be thoroughly trained ' 

SARAH E. SEAGER, Vice-Principal Public School. 

MARION STATION, MD., April, 1902. 

• v-^^^ . .°"® y®^*" ^t Williamsport Dickinson Seminarv nnrl 
wish that I could have completed my education My s^n spent four 
stitution. ^ Seminary, and he has no regrets for attending the m- 

The discipline of the school is good, liie location i^ beautiful ,1,0 
theT'wo^rk.^' ^'^ '^"^"^'"' ^"^^ *^^ t«^«»>«- are thoroughTy"fitt"ed tot 

citalogul """"^ ^°""^ ''^'"'" Z'fr^^^ ^ "^""^ education to send for a 
_^^°^"*- NATHAN T. CONNER, Post Master. 



89 



BOSTON, MASS., April 29, 1902. 

never ceSsed silf^Z '"nf^^l""^ ^°^ ^^'^ '^"^'•- ^y sisters have 
thi L„ t^ speakmg of the good which they received through 

whn w^*; "J^^ °^ yourself and your assistants. My younger sTstfr 
nnrf ZJa ""^"^^^^ .t" 'n^alid. I think was never ill a day in WUliim7-' 
port, and wnen through school was greatlv imnrovA^ i^, tl" 
advantages which your school had to oiler "^ louTs very truC^"'' 
Of Air,«n^ ^ /^ V, ^ EDWARD R. GRABOW, 

scoft. Mais °''' P'-°J^'-*«t°'-« «f New Ocean House, Swamp- 

LAURELTON, PA., April 29, 1902. 
I consider Williamsport Dickinson Seminary one of the lAnr?i,io. 
schools of our State. The facilities for mental and moral cultur™ 
complete, the discipline most beneficial, home comfon and heaithfu? 
ness unsurpassed My opinion is based mainly on the training rfvin 
to two of my children, attending the school a total ot six yeafs^Ind 
the training of many young men and women who have gone from the 
school to succeed in whatever they have undertaken. T^ their tml!^ 

S. W. RUTHERFORD, Merchant. 

JERSEY SHORE, PA., MAY 1 1902 
Williamsport Dickinson Seminary prepared mv son thnrn„o-i,i„ f„ 
college. Its facilities, healthf ulness, present improved comffrt J a . 
very special. The Music Hall and its system of teaching m^y be a^s 
most highly commended. The institution should be ov^r-crowde," 
with students. Yours very truly, crowdec 

W. V. GANOE, Pastor M. E.Church. 

STRASBURG, PA., April 30, 1902. 
.J f ^® 'i®®". entrusted with the education of three daughters t' ^ 
If fi ^uated at Hackettstown Collegiate Institute; fhe seco.,.. 
at the Woman's College, Baltimore, and the youngest electe,?w 
liamsport Dicl^inson Seminary, and is now flnisMng^the lecond 3^ar" 

Prom what I know, my estimate on moral lines gives WilliamsDort 
Dickinson Seminary the precedence of the three ThrVnH^^^^ 
home life is fine. The supervision for the best interest of ^^hL 7 
the formative period of life could not be better at homi "^ ^ '=^"** ^" 

Therefore, commending the Seminary to all parents whn -nror^t „ 
.school to whicJi they may leave their children wirhconfldrnce i^hlv 
ing their interests guarded as they would at home, I remain 

„,. Respectfully, 
W. K. BENDER, Agriculturist and Insurance. 



REISTERSTOWN, PA., April, 1902. 
hooff.T ^'^®"'^i"Sf three years in Williamsport, Dickinson Seminarv I 

elucai'^rfn Th'^'p? "^ '"'''T\^ '^^"''''"^ ^^'^ t^^'"- d'-^'^^terH liberal 
eaucatlon in the Classics or Arts. BEULAH R, MU.I.ER, 

Teacher i'-iankland High Hcliuol. 

RAYS HILL, PA., Apiil. [902. 
I have one son a graduate of Williamsi.uri Dickinson Semin ,rv nnri 
nno her a ^tu.V'M there at time of writiif,. I thin LlZo excels 
m Uie opportunities an,l rulvantages it affords to poo ^^.u, "men and 
Sn^kges iroffirs-"life 'fh°"^ '"'Tr^ " exerrs,°and in "^tlir social 
Tp^nTc^ '^itr/o^odii'Js^s l^nTcu^ltre'^^-lorL^el Thl e'x^c'^Lnf J^^" 

e^^e-cf SonXTii'^s^u^lLttrtS^"^^ ^ — faille S^HcJo^d 

Sincerely, 
ROBERT M. SKILLINGTOOSr, Farmer. 

,, . HEADSVILLE, W. VA., May 5, 1902. 

It gives me great pleasure to recommend Wllliamsoort Dickinson 
grTdrtTfrom U^'r"^.' r^^^^ ^"? a daughter, re^aTiTeran^'d M^ds 

T. ,«,^ ^ . SHAMOKIN, PA., May 5, 1902. 

C. L. BENSCOTER, 

Pastor Second M. E. Church. 

T ,u„^ . „ ^^^ WASHINGTON. PA., April, 1902. 

pa're''n^^^;'i^^rnrrgrd"Lre"il'S'"sX?l"^'r°" ^'"^'T'^ '^ ^^^ 

time win never be^rStt^n^^^TV^^ Tn^sfru^r nXs^eln" v^e^ry^ar 
"'*'*°'^''- MRS. MARY McMURRAY, Merchant! 

evIrnhln^'^s'!foJf/''f l!^"'' ^""^ ^°' ^'^°' ^^^ systematic way in which 

FRANCES M. BASIL, Music Teacher. 
Wa ti„r,v f V , CHICAGO, ILL., May 2, 1902. 

inTealttn'irs \'nd°°^'iscfp",ir '^inYTr'o""^^"'^ ^'^'^'"^°" ^^-'^-^ 
wMle^ there I saw ^^^^''^'r^'orL^n!^^^^^ -f/^-n^ 

W. J. lii^MSTRBET, Insurance Agent. 



90 



FIFTY-FOURTH ANNUAL CATALOGUE. 



WILLIAMSPORT DICKINSON SEMINARY. 



91 



JERSEY SHORE, PA., May, 1902. 

I am very glad, indeed, to commend Williamsport Dickinson Semi- 
nary. My knowledge of the school is not personal, having never been 
a student, but I have been impressed wit)) the excellency of the school 
since my (iauprhter spent two years there. 

The sf^'udid iiiyLrucliun i!i the rlass-rooiii, the atmosphere ol hi^,!! 
thinking, with the excellent musiLal advantag-es and the healthiui 
location, combine to make it an institution worthv of highest recom- 
mendation. Very truly yours. 

C. B. SEELY, Editor. 

TOWN HILL, May, 1902. 
Williamsport Dickinson Seminary is to be commended for the in- 
-spiring influence it exerts upon the life of young people. This in- 
fluence is due to the three factors which dominate the life and work 
of the school: 

(1) Her home-like qualities; she seeks to provide for the health 
and happiness of all. 

(2) Her method and discipline; she endeavors to instill the value 
of system into each life. 

(3) Her facilities for mental and moral culture. Her highest aim 
IS to supply the world with highest types of manhood and woman- 
hood. While she endeavors to enlighten and expand the mind, she 
ever keeps before her the fact that heart-culture— love toward God 
and man — is equally, if not more, necessary. 

I can attest to her power and influence upon my life, having passed 
her curriculum, and readily recommend her to all seeking a good 
home and a higher education. 

W. L. ARMSTRONG, Minister. 

< PHILADELPHIA, PA., May 14, 1902. 

I was for several years a student in Williamsport Dickinson Semi- 
nary, and three times a conference visitor. I have been for 
the last three years a patron, and as secretary of the Philadelphia 
Conference Educational Society I have for two years conducted a cor- 
respondence with the President and with such students as were bene- 
ficiaries of the said Society. 

I most cheerfully and unqualifiedly recommend the Seminary to all 
parents and guardians who desire a thorough and a Christian educa- 
tion for their children and wards. Among the special attractions of 
the Seminary is its home-life character, to which Mrs. E. J. Gray has 
largely and effectively contributed, and for which hundreds of stu- 
dents will hold her in grateful and loving rembrance. 

The institution has done much for education and religion, and de- 
serves the generous support of the Church. 

S. A. HEILNER, 

Pastor St. James M. E. Church. 

TYRONE, PA., May, 1902. 
My acquaintance with Williamsport Dickinson Seminary covers 
a period of twenty-five years. In location it is delightful and health- 
ful, m home comforts and social life all that could be desired, in in- 
tellectual and moral training unsurpassed. 

Two of my sons being graduates, and myself having been a resi- 
dent pastor in Williamsport for four years, have brought meinto ciose 
touch with the institution. 

With this personal knowledge of its life and work, I most heartily 
commend it to those desiring a higher education. 

J. A. WOOD, JR., 
Pastor First M. E. Church. 



iJ 



A* I ^ 



BEVERLY, MASS., May, 1902. 

I count It a great privilege to have been a student at Williamsport 
d1?^o7 P'lnn.™!^^"^' ^''r'^r!' ^-.^^^^tifully situated in a most heTKf 
e^cluLf j^^v^'^'f' The educational advantages of the school nre 

fir^ ;../ .^''\^^'",^ ^^"^^ ^"^ prepare for the sterner duties 01 JHe 
— nrm, yet not burdensome. The Christian atmosphere whi. h 

Its highest aim is 



pervades the school Is both helpful md edifying- 



to develoi* 
hood. 



thosf^ qualitl.'s which 



make noble manhood and woman - 
FI.ORENCE BARTCH FORD. 



FREDERICK, MD., May 20, 1902. 
<^L.f^^r^J^!^\u^^^^i confidence recommend Williamsport Dickinson 

aent at the institution, I have personal knowledge of its suoerior piri 
vantages in its pleasant and healthful location, fnd its refining morl 
culture, and I believe it to be worthy of a liberal and een^^^^ 
port from all who appreciate the value of a suplrfor educltTon ''' 

JOHN C. MOTTER, Judge Circuit Court. 

PHILIPSBURG, PA., May 16, 1902. 
I regard Williamsport Dickinson Seminary as at least the emmi 
of any school of its kind in this country. I have been ?n touch wUh 
It for nine years. Three of my children were gradult^s I am de^nlv 
impressed with its home-like character, its heal thfufness the m^^^^ 
^o^k^^^lTLt^/^'''- ^"^ ^^- facilitie^^?o^r^Ve^ntari^n^d 

their children. G. D. PENEPACKER, Pastor M. E. Church. 

WILLIAMSPORT, PA., May 17, 1902. 
As a neighboring minister of the Williamsport Dickinson Seminarv 
as pastor of those students who are Presbyterians and « fTtb J; 
whose daughter spent two years in the SemTnarri' wish after five 

Side'' for fhr^^'ir/? "^P^""" "^^ strong "^^dmTrluof Of Tnl 
gratitude for the spiritual tone, moral carefulness, intellectual thor- 
oughness, and general worth of the institution. "^^^^^eciuai tnor- 

WILLIAM DAYTON ROBERTS, 

Pastor First Presbyterian Church. 

„ . ^ WOOLRICH, PA., May 27, 1902. 

th^rvefrs rn.Vnf'^^H- l"" Williamsport Dickinson Seminary for 

tion of Rev f^r rLJ '^^h'^^. ^^""^^^ ^^^ ^^^^^ ^^^ ^^^^^ administra- 
ter« ?^ offl* ? ^^^^' ^""^ ^'^^^ having had one son and two daugh- 
irthe^nstitu^^^^^^ whom graduated and the other a studint 

u il f !o?! l^^^^/^ ^^^ present time, I can say that in my judgment 
L\l ^^^.^,h«^^ f«^ young people, especially for young ladies A^ all 

heluhful'^ Thl%.'^e?|-^'^' ^.^^ P"^^^^^^^ ^^^^^^^h' '' is certainly very 
whTii t^o i-T faculties for mental and moral culture are excellent 
while the literary societies are a great help to industrious students 
I commend the institution to parents seeking a safe and comfoSe 
home, as well as a good school, for their children. comrortable 

M. B. RICH, Woolen Manufacturer. 
HOYTVILLE, PA., May 24, 1902. 

inlrTr..l\Z' h^dT d\!rgh7eTS^^ «^-; 

entirely satisfactory, espf ciallyTs^^o liXTine' an'd'^ home'^coi?;?ons^ 
and I would recommend it to those seeking a higher eduTltion ' 

G. W. DARBY, Farmer. 



1 



92 



FIFTY-FOURTH ANNUAI. CATALOGUE. 



MILLERSBURG, PA., May, 1902. 
Three of my children have graduated from "Old Dickinson," and I 
also graduated in 1863. I consider it a fine institution, and for dis- 
cipline, culture, healthfulness, and Christian training it has no equal 
in the country. S. S. BOWMAN, Attorney-at-Law. 

JEFFERSON CITY, MO., May, 1902. 

My knowledge of your Seminary, derived from my dauprhters, who 
were day pupils while in attendance, enables me to speak hi^ldy of 
its healthfulness, discipline and excellent features for mental an(i 
moral culture, resulting in their marked advancement, general im 
provement, and successful attainments while remaining under its 
care. Respectfully, 

OSCAR G. BURCH 
Cashier First National Bank. 

GIRARDVILLE, PA., May, 1902. 

I have received my knowledge of Williamsport Dickinson Seminary 
from my daughter, who recently graduated from that institution. 

The facilities for mental culture and development are excellent, the 
variety of courses gives the student the opportunity of selecting the 
line of study for which he is best adapted. The location of the Sem- 
inary is not only pleasant, but healthful as well — a fact of great im- 
portance to be considered in connection with our education. 

Respectfully, 

H. B. JOHNSON, 
Justice of the Peace. 

BALTIMORE, MD., May, 1902. 
1 consider the work of the Seminary, over which you preside, as of a 
very high order. The school is admirably located. Parents need not 
hesitate to send their children to an institution of learning where the 
discipline, moral atmosphere and mental training are so excellent as 
at Williamsport Dickinson Seminary. 

I have been a resident of Williamsport for twelve years, and am a 
patron of the school, and have had opportunity to know whereof I 
speak. Yours very cordially, 

S. G. READING, 
Pastor Hampden Baptist Church. 

ALTOONA, PA., May, 1902. 
It affords me a great deal of pleasure to commend Williamsport 
Dickinson Seminary to all persons desiring to send their children to 
a school embracing all the comforts of a home, healthfulness and 
every facility for mental and moral culture. Perhaps it might be 
well to mention that my reason for recommending the school is based 
on having had a daughter graduate from it last year, after being with 
you three years. Yours very truly, 

W. W. RUDISILL., Jeweler. 



H^ 



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♦♦ 



TELEPHONES : Office, 2523 ; Reside«ce» 360-A. 

...DENTIST... 

N. E, Cor. Third i^tl viarket Stn^., over Mussina'**. !e'*''«/elrv ^fnrr 

WILLIAMSPORT, PA. 



Grant D* Stadoti, 

exclusive millinery 



OMLY FiFiST -CLASS COMPANIES REPRESENTED. 

Champion $ Tire Insurance flflency, 



OFFICE, 33S PINE STREET, 



\A/'ILL1 A M SPORT, PA. 



MARK A. CHAMPION, 

Agent for IMPERIAL, of London ; GRLLNWH'H. uf New York; MLRCHANiS, of Newark ■ AR- 
MENIA, of Pittsburg ; WESTt RN of Pittsburg. Telephone 3122. 



Ch 



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^«, 



SEM Z BRO IHERS, 

Silver, Glass and Kitchen Ware 

KINE Givu^iwKiES. 



319 P'NE STREET, 



WILLIAHSl UKT, PA. 



nionpsox, gjbson 6. co., 

Cor. Fourth » s t (.e5treet«. 



< 



DRESS GOODS AND SILKS. 
NOTIONS AND TRIMMINGS. 
UNDERWEAR AND HOSIERY. 
LACE CURTAINS AND DRAPERIES. 

AN UP-TO-DATE STOCK A, WAV^ as -OUR SFRV'CE 

TiiOMPiSON, GIBSON & CO 



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Dry Goods, Carpets, Ulooks and Suits 

43, 45 AND 47 WEST IHiRD SIRLtT, 

(OPP. THE COURT HOUSE). 

The Faculty and Students *>f Du^kiiison Smnimfy u\x\\Aid lu make our 

*^tore their headcjUHitcrs. 



iJK:s. KI.UMP ^ IIKKTZ, 

D ENTIS TS , 
Southwest corner Third and Markr t Sfrrffs, WILLIAMSPORT; PENNA. 



Appointments Made by Mail or Telephone. 



X, J RUFNSTOIN 



PocVet K 



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«i.. z () r s ii n. 



d ^ci 



issors 



No. 22 E. THIRD ST., W!l ! lAM^^POPT ha 



lie Hew Seminary Book Store 



Is located on WEST FOURTH STREET, 
one door below William Street, where you 
will find a full line of 

We also keep a full line of Books and Stationery. 



Mrs. Schnee, manager. 



A. R. HiNCKLEY CO. 



For Firc^ Life and Accident Insurance 

In companies that have stood the test for more than a cen- 
tury, call, telephone or write 



CLlNril^K'S AO 



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Y 



lio. 3»7 Pin* Street 



WII/LIAMSPORT, PA. 






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Oeorgc Bubb Si Sons, 

i4/lioleesale. Grocer8 

...and Tea Dealers 



Wn I lAMSPOI^I l»A 




... riNE AllLLlNEKY 

lUU \\ I- ^s i I' UUK in ST. 



McCORMICK & HERDK; 



Fire Tii 



1 — f 



SUSQUi^iiANNA iKUSi BUILDING, 



l^fiT ^ T 



'iaZ: T L L I 7:^ 7VT S PO R I . } «. . 



-AJIT SXO-R-FJ 



J. R. HAZELET, 



DEALER IN ALL KINDS OF 



mw Paper ana mnm shades 



Cochran, Payne & McCormick 
Building. 



NO. 149 WEST lui Hill ^ikEET, 



'A, 



Stationery, Picture FramtM, Coru.,.-,^ »i^,i , n^r^.i-lnffs, Olats Shadow, 

Chromoa, Wax ana Arftjf^ MatenuU. 

ALSO PAir^TER, GRAIN KR a ^d Vavv. 



K ' \ M. 



^GER. 



n 




KEELER COMPANY, 

Boilers, Stack:s^ ^ "T 

WILLIAn^r»OPT lA 

We make a specialty of Steam and Hot Water Heating. Full line of 

Engineers' buppiies, i'unips <iiui tsarden Ii«>se. 



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